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colonycapture

Member Since 29 Nov 2013
Offline Last Active Nov 30 2013 02:55 PM

#5112918 How to continue RPG?

Posted by colonycapture on 29 November 2013 - 03:02 AM

This is a very good question that plenty of budding game developers hit. We actually recently wrote a teaching document that covers this issue here:

 

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1WSccZfWbInBAJvjU4to-np0UzXYa9Tllm7WCda612GM/edit

 

It's a bit long, but your problem is quite complex. Quite simply, you've created a nice little game engine with some features. Which don't get me wrong, is freaking awesome. So many people never get this far at all (Maybe 15-20%?). I commend your efforts.

 

The problem is you're not really experienced in making an entire game, you've definitely gotta learn this stuff but when professional developers make their games they don't code anything at first. They go through a long pre-production process where they design, playtest, and refine the game. Because every bug you fix BEFORE you have to code, is a whole hell of a lot less work.

 

I'd suggest you read the  thing  linked, it addresses the very beginning of a game project and how we went about it for our current little project. Specifically, you probably want to design out and solidify your vision for what you want your game to be, what you want it to accomplish, and let that lead into all the things you have to do to make that happen.

 

If you got a moment, check out our project on Kickstarter, it's specifically designed with folk like you in mind (We're trying to teach people game development!)

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/cwssoftware/colony-capture-teaching-games-through-doing

 

Cheers!




#5112916 Newbie and need help about future!

Posted by colonycapture on 29 November 2013 - 02:56 AM

Learn a  LOW level programming language (C is good) REALLY well. Now you can learn most other languages in 2-3 days. Learn a few weirder ones that aren't C-like (Scheme,Lisp come to mind). C++ which is what you're currently learning is fine, but I (And many other hardcore professional devs) want people to understand memory management and if the lowest programming language you know is C++ you will be lost at a lot of things that have become recently important in mobile game devleopment.

 

Relations to game engines to coding : In essence game engines are like giant libraries to make games. Some are much more complex and bigger then others, but in essence it's a tool you use to make your game that takes care of things you don't want to code yourself. Which is fine, because we wouldn't be very far if every time we wanted to make a game we had to code our own graphics rendering and physics (Though people that can and do, do this, are awesome).

 

Starting learning to make games without coding.. Is this possible, yes? There are plenty of plug and play game creation gui driven game engines that hide all the code. But I would buckle down and learn coding, cause you'll need it sooner rather then later.

 

If you become a software engineer, you can uh, join any gaming "Field". Most software engineers become some kind of coder/programmer/software engineer in the industry. It's a pretty generic role. I myself programmed in the game industry on many games whose skills directly correlated to what I'm doing now in the scientific/medial field instead of games. So you'll have plenty of options. Also, joining the industry as a programmer is probably the path of least resistance due to the lack of software engineers in general in the world to meet the extreme demand.




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