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GroovyOne

Member Since 25 Jul 2002
Offline Last Active Apr 08 2016 07:54 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: 1 hr of Voice Acting translates into how much hrs of Voice Actor work?

11 March 2016 - 01:32 PM

Thanks for feedback/tips tricks, keep them comming :-).

 

 

Groovy one:

 You wrote:

 

"Typically we budget about 100 lines per hour - given 2 maybe 3 takes per line."

 

100 lines per hour with 2-3 retakes in the end translates to how long final voice acting output? 30 minutes?

 

This averages to about 12 seconds per line. with 3 takes one after another then you get about 20 minutes of final audio.

 

So if the actor is able to nail the performance, delivery quickly in 2 takes you get more.

 

If the average line length shorter then you get more... etc.


In Topic: 1 hr of Voice Acting translates into how much hrs of Voice Actor work?

10 March 2016 - 04:27 PM

By the way, I highly highly recommend this piece of kit 

 

https://auphonic.com

 

It's a batch processor which takes a lot of guesswork levelling dialog.

 

I run it both before processing and mastering to get my VO to a consistent level across the session, and then once more after processing and mastering to ensure it adheres to the final dialog levels we wish to have in game.


In Topic: 1 hr of Voice Acting translates into how much hrs of Voice Actor work?

10 March 2016 - 03:57 PM

Typically we budget about 100 lines per hour - given 2 maybe 3 takes per line.

 

If the lines are story driven then the delivery can take some work to nail down.  If the weight of the lines have to portray a certain emotion or will drive the animation, more time can be spend on single lines - like the 'wow' example. A branding word, or phrase will get a high priority and many takes to achieve the vision.

 

Typically if you have a lot of dialog, you want someone from the client to be present - to help provide direction rather than guessing what they want and then having to re-book studio and or actor again.

 

If you have a lot of dialogue, it may also be worth splitting it into multiple sessions so that you can take the feedback and apply it to retakes if necessary in following sessions.

 

We have done some character based games where most of the dialog is callouts 2-7 words only, we average over 1000 individual takes which works out to about 300-ish lines in 2hours of recording and so the editing takes up to about 8-9 hours after that to name and find takes by an editor.


In Topic: Which type of sounds you are looking for most ?

21 January 2016 - 03:29 PM

Haha.. the gekko - sounds either like a creak door, or a land dolphin..

 

I wonder if you slow it down it may sound like choirs singing...


In Topic: Do you ever hold back on music

08 January 2016 - 11:17 AM

I'm wondering why you would want to hold it back in the first place. Did you sign away all rights to the music in the contract?

 

I've written some pretty good tunes in my time for clients but never held them back - I didn't have any reason to. Part of the business is learning to let go, and also to negotiate better up front.

 

Like CCH says : Unless contractually specified it's up to you to put the piece forwards for review / acceptance or not. Think of it this way, even if the game is low profile, would you not want it out there published as an example of your skill - part of your portfolio of what you can do for games. You can think of it as an investment rather than a loss.


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