Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account

FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

We have 4 x Pro Licences (valued at $59 each) for 2d modular animation software Spriter to give away in this Thursday's GDNet Direct email newsletter.


Read more in this forum topic or make sure you're signed up (from the right-hand sidebar on the homepage) and read Thursday's newsletter to get in the running!


Way Walker

Member Since 11 May 2003
Offline Last Active Dec 18 2011 06:13 PM

#2592048 Going to post your game idea? Read this first

Posted by Way Walker on 31 July 2004 - 07:04 PM

Quote:
Original post by boolean
I do agree on the 'posting in the first hour' syndrome, and I cant see much of a way to stop people from doing that.


Maybe by enforcing it? Not directly as in checking if they have been a member for at least an hour. Hide it in one of those "You will get an e-mail, in the e-mail will be a password. Come back with that password." registration things. It's fairly standard procedure, and then, just send the e-mail out an hour after registration. The e-mail could contain something like what you wrote and "hidden" (i.e. not "PASSWORD: XXXXXXXX") in there would be the password, so they have to read it somewhat rather than just scanning for "PASSWORD".

Anyway, I always thought it was proper netiquette to both read the FAQ or at least know what it contains (though some of the FAQ's on this site and elsewhere leave much to be desired...), and to "lurk" for at least a month before posting (some suggest longer, but I think a month is a good balance).

Hmm... maybe sticking new comers in a kiddie pool or moderated board (only feasible if the vast majority of posts are not from new comers, which I doubt is the case). This could be another way of enforcing the "lurk before you post" rule and would go well with a policy of "No anonymous posters" (which has its own pros and cons).


#2590551 Leveling "out" via building networks (RPG)

Posted by Way Walker on 30 July 2004 - 06:34 PM

Quote:
Original post by Wavinator
It's All About The NPCs
You can expand as much as you like, but everything depends on a limited pool of NPCs who follow you. They're responsible for whether your property / operation does well, what events you have to attend to, and how big you can grow.


Limited in what way? In that you can only have so many, or that there are only so many NPC's in the "universe"? If this is MMO (is it?) limiting the total number could be disastrous (or save you, perhaps if the population slowly increased as the player base increased? or just over time?) If limited in the number you can have, how do you grow beyond a certain point?

Quote:

As the network grows, you still are limited to your main followers, who in turn must be promoted to (behind the scenes) manage more followers. If you want more bases / ships, you have to promote the NPCs to a higher rank and group several assets under one NPC. If you promote an NPC above your own rank, however, you must pay them more and over time guard against them losing loyalty and trying to take over the operation. This is done to encourage you to get out and earn rank yourself, but allows an out if you want to sit back and empire build without exposing yourself to risk.


My appologies, but I realize this is not a self-contained thread and I have not read the other threads. How do you earn rank yourself? It sounded like you were describing a system where you earned rank through management and the number of people under you was a sort of measure of your rank. I'm obviously misunderstanding :)

Quote:

Most, however, call you up periodically with either opportunities or problems which create missions. A NPC might call about a syndicate that's pressing them and ask what you want to do; or tell you that if you buy a bunch of raw goods near you they can capitalize on a trade opportunity for a one time quick cash bonus. There would be a wide list of semi-random events, with urgencies and consequences relating directly to the NPC's experience.


Ha! For some reason I picture Bruce Almighty checking his "Yahweh" account ;) How much interaction do these events take? It almost sounds like you could just give a quick little decision. Or do you have to go discuss with representatives of the other syndicate? Or do you have to go to the actual site of operations and deal with things first hand? Or could you just tell the NPC "Use your judgement" when you either just don't feel like it or, perhaps, have another semi-random event that's more pressing? Or perhaps whichever you deem appropriate?

Quote:

If your focus was killing monsters, leveling up and doing missions, hopefully this would not be too much of a wild deviation from that. You could, for instance, establish a refueling and rearming base in the middle of hostile territory, or even a shop to buy and sell your goods so that you didn't have to travel back to civilization. You could import training centers, rec facilities for your crew, etc.


So, business man by day, Jack the Ripper by night? Dr. Jekyl and Mr. Hyde? Can I tell my NPC underlings "Just make it work" and shoot stuff?

Quote:

Would you play this in an RPG, or would it feel too much like some other game?


Don't know what you're planning, but sounds like you're trying to make one gameplay work for all types by letting them manage various bits to the level that interests them. Would I be able to manage everything? What happens if I just put everything on auto-pilot?

Or maybe you're planning something else? Reading this post put in my head the idea of a MMO universe with several games interacting. You play whichever game interests you. If you like tycoon games, maybe you set up some sort of business selling something useful to other PCs (or even NPCs). If you like adventure, maybe you deliver the goods to dangerous locations. If you like action, maybe you play a bounty hunter collecting on adventurers who are on the run after a failed shipment, or an assassin out for the president of some company, or a marine fighting for your country. If you like empire building, maybe you're a political leader making/breaking alliances, commanding the army, setting taxes, and worried about which planets you control and to what extent. Each game has a different interface appropriate to that game, and they feed off each other (I think it would be "neat" to buy my equipment as a bounty hunter from some PC run business). Bah, it's late, probably been said before, and probably a bad idea.


PARTNERS