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mikeman

Member Since 10 May 2004
Offline Last Active Today, 05:58 AM

Topics I've Started

Any success stories of internet teams?

16 January 2012 - 07:16 AM

I wonder these last few days how well the whole internet-gamedev-team works out. I know there are many out there, but very few seem to make it. Personally, as a programmer, am always looking to collaborate with artists in order to make games. My ideal situation would be a very small team of me and a couple of artists. I'm not dead set on realizing my own projects, it could be the artist's idea just as well. I just want to handle the programming. However, all of my efforts so far have fall short. It's really, *really* hard to find good artists/designers(real designers, not 'idea guys') that are interested to collaborate without immediate payment. I suppose this is partly expected, but where are all the people that just want to team up and make good indie games? One would think that sites like this would be heaven for wannabe-game developers, but in practice finding people to team up with seems impossible. And when you do find someone, it's always with this super-grandeur idea that you know has no chance in hell of being implemented by a team of volunteers.

So, to cheer ourselves up, let's here about some success stories! If you have had a good experience with a team you built through the net, talk to us about it! How did you recruited? What games did you make? Why do you think your team was successful? I think it will be interesting to hear stories like that.

Physics for wipeout-like game

28 September 2011 - 05:31 AM

Hello. This is a problem I haven't been able to solve 'perfectly' for a long time. Basically, I want to implement some basic arcade vehicle physics for a game similar to Wipeout, featuring tracks with slopes. The vehicles are hovercrafts, hovering over the surface of the road. I tried to implement raycast car such as this:

For every 'imaginary wheel'(usually at the 4 corners of the vehicle):

1)Perform a raycast and find the distance to the ground
2)Calculate a spring force, damped by some factor
3)Apply the force to the wheel position.

This is how it's done, right? Regardless, I can't achieve perfectly smooth motion on slopes, the vehicle either noticably 'jitters' when the spring is too hard or, on the other hand, takes too long to "conform" to the slope, so to speak, if the dampening is too much.

Am I missing something here? If anyone has some pseudo-code on how it's properly done I would be greatful. Thanks!

Critisize my cover letter

01 September 2011 - 04:53 AM

Ok, so I'm about to send an application to a nearby game company(one of the very very few that exist here) and I'm thinking the cover letter is pretty important. So I'd like if gamedev members took a look at it and offer some critisism on how to introduce myself better. As I said in the title, I'm interested in the bold truth in order to really make some good corrections, so let me have it!

Thanks in advance, and here it is(I have deleted the names, but some of you may guess what they are):

Dear sirs,



Hello. My name is Michael Mitsopoulos and I’m writing to you because I am really interested in working in your company, XXX, and more specifically in the first Greek MMORPG game, XXX.



A little about myself. I am 29 years old, and a graduate of the Technological Institute(TEI) of Athens in Informatics. I was interested in computers and their applications from a young age, I believe I was around 10 when I started experimenting in programming in my old 286 with QBasic. As is natural with most kids, I developed an interest in game programming in particular, which I found fascinating. I made many little games there, like a slot-machine game, a Hangman game, and even a clone of Scorched Earth with planets and spaceships instead of mountains and tanks.



I don’t want to bore you, so fast forward to today, I am familiar with a dozen of languages, have studied now programming and CS in general formally, I am familiar with advanced programming techniques, multithreading, design patterns, SOLID principles, I have worked professionally as a programmer mainly in database programming, but still my passion is in programming for games. I see working in your company as a terrific chance of combining my passion and my job at the same time.



I have been following XXX since its birth, and it’s very interesting to see how it has grown to its current status. I especially liked from the start the fact that, unlike most MMORPGs today, the battles are not click-and-wait, but real-time FPS-like battles, and I’m impressed on how the engineers pulled this off considering it’s an massive online game, with the issues of latency and lag we all know exist in these games.



I think I will be a valuable asset to your company and to XXX development team, because, first of all, I consider myself to be fairly experienced in programming and game/graphics programming in general, but most of all because I am a good communicator, a team player, and I’m always eager to learn new things and techniques(when I’m working on the computer and not trying to create my own game, you’ll most probably find me scanning the net for interesting new methods, especially pertaining to graphics and gameplay organization). In short, for some reason(be it the environment I grew up or…the ‘genes’) I have a passion for game developing, and I would love being part of the XXX team, having a chance to work alongside talented developers which I’m sure have many things to teach me about the trade.



About the positions I would prefer, as I said I am very interested in graphics, so a position in the rendering technology department would make me most happy. Alternatively, I am interested in tools development too, as it is kind of a special category where the software you write is used to organize and optimize the work of the team itself, which means there will be communication and some sort of managerial challenges which I find fascinating.



Finally a bit about my own projects…I am experienced in C++, D3D and OpenGL, among others(I list all my skills in my resume), and have created the usual small games(Pong,Tetris,Arkanoid and such) before I started on some more demanding projects. I have attempted, in a few occasions, to gather together an internet team, mostly 3D artists, so I can complete a more well-sized game. Those efforts had various degrees of success, none though resulted in a game ready to publish, mainly because internet teams are too disjointed, and people work whenever they like to, so progress was quite slow.



For good or for worse though, I have uploaded and included some videos of some of my projects. So they are:



i)The closest I ever get to a finished project, a futuristic 3D racer. I got a team together to work on the art for the environments, but as I said it didn’t work out. However, the code was pretty solid and in good state.



Gameplay video:

Editor:



ii)a 3D isometric action game. The guy I worked with was pretty talented in 3D art, but real-life issues made him quit, and so the project stayed as it were.







iii)A small 3D fighting game featuring Gods of several mythologies.







iv)This is my latest effort, a small FPS game.







About the rest of my credentials, I have a Proficiency in English language, and I have completed my army duties normally.



Thank you for reading this letter, and I hope I’ll hear from you.



With Regards,

Michael Mitsopoulos


Clatify this for me(evolution)

12 August 2011 - 06:04 AM

I'm currently reading Richard Dawkins book "The greatest show on earth", which I recommend to everyone, it's a really well written book. I haven't finished it yet, but I have some questions that the book doesn't seem to answer(at least, from what I read), or probably I missed them. Basically:

1)The whole mechanism of evolution is mutation+natural selection, am I correct? That is, let's take the eye or the lungs. They were first maybe a very simple organ for detecting light, and in the passage of many millenia, random mutations happened in the genes that "coded" that organ, and those mutations that helped the organism survive better remained, while others(the most) were discarded. It must follow that happened thousands or millions of "beneficial" mutations? Is that basically it, or am I missing something, is there a more sophisticated mechanism?

2)What I don't understand at all, since my days of highschool, is how completely new species arise. It is talked about in the book how we see evolution real-time in dog or flower breeding(it gives an example of foxes being bred in such a way that they give birth, after some generations, to foxes that look and behave more like dogs), it is talked about experiments in bacteria that show the same things. What I'm lost is if we know how new species arise. Does that happen due to mutation, that is, at some point happen a series of mutation that turn some population of a species to another species, genetically incompatible with the first one? When a species "splits" in half, with the halves being genetically incompatible so we can talk about different species? If so, what happens, do whole chromosomes get added or subtracted(as we know, different species have different number of chromosomes).

Thanks in advance for any helpful answers.

Post pictures of YUO!

21 July 2011 - 12:44 AM

We have a long time we haven't do this, so I thought I'd make one. Plus, I like playing with my brand new digital cam. :P

I'll start!

Posted Image

I'm curious to see what all the new members look like :)

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