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mvBarracuda

Member Since 03 Feb 2005
Offline Last Active Mar 16 2012 06:22 PM
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Topics I've Started

How to protect your software project from poisonous people *video*

06 January 2011 - 08:55 PM

Not sure if this fits in here, but as it's project management related, I'll go ahead. Feel free to move it to a different subforum.

The video is based on the experiences of some Google developers working on Subversion. While it's primarily meant for open source projects, I'm pretty sure that other closed source volunteer projects can greatly benefit from it as well.

Anyway, I've rewatched this video from time to time and I always find it incredibly useful and funny at the same time. Because the speakers describe problems you'll encounter in almost all team software projects that require collaboration.

So without further ado, enjoy: How to protect your software projects from poisonous people

[Edited by - mvBarracuda on January 7, 2011 3:43:21 AM]

Artists and (distributed) version control

06 December 2010 - 10:04 PM

I hope that this thread fits in here. It's not software engineering related, but rather a project management topic. But as there are a couple of project management threads in here, I figured that this might be the right place to post in.

Anyway, I'm working in the project management department of an open source game. Right now we're using SVN for version control and store code and assets in the same repository. Source versions of assets (models, textures) reside in a separate media branch, while the rendered versions of the assets (we're working on an isometric 2d game, so we actually use rendered 2d images of the 3d models in the game) reside close to the code, as they're needed to be in place to run the game.

Our artists had a hard time to get started with using Subversion and to wrap their head around the concept of version control in general. Right now the project mostly consists of programmers and we're considering to move from SVN to distributed version control to ease working with branches (and the associated merging process) and sending in patches. We haven't made a decision about which DVCS to use yet, but we will most likely end up using either Mercurial or Git.

While distributed version control is great for developers with a technical background, it might seem overly complex and complicated for artist and other prolly less tech savvy devs.

So I'm looking for all kinds of advice how we could ease the version control workflow for artists. Keep in mind that using something like Perforce, regardless of how suited it might be for the job, is not option for a free of charge open source project. So I'm pretty much rather looking for advice, tutorials, project tools that make it easy for artists to wrap their head around distributed version control, especially Hg and/or Git.

Is it even worth going down that route and try to get the artists using distributed version control? We could continue to store the source versions of assets (textures, models) in our existing SVN repository. But we would still have to find a solution for the assets that are needed to run the game, as they should reside close to the code in version control.

There are a bunch of great DVCS guides out there, e.g. the Hginit tutorial. However the ones I've found were all written for programmers. It's great that they can now easily locally commit, use the full potential of branches and merge back their changes without too much hassle. But this might not be beneficial for artists but rather overly complex and scary to them. Do you happen to know a DVCS tutorial that was written for artists as the primary target audience?

We're also using Trac for project management purposes, so if you know of a Trac plugin that is artist friendly, let me know as well :-)

[Edited by - mvBarracuda on December 7, 2010 5:34:32 PM]

PARPG: isometric old school 2d RPG - first techdemo available now

11 March 2010 - 02:06 AM

The first techdemo of our post-apocalyptical isometric 2d RPG is available for Linux, Mac, Win32 and all sorts of BSD variants now. Screenshot: PARPG techdemon 1 screenshot Video: PARPG r472 video (slightly older than the released techdemo) Download instructions: http://blog.parpg.net/2010/03/parpg-techdemo-1-finally-available/ More information about the project can be found at our blog: http://blog.parpg.net Right now we're trying to find a new maintainer for the project who takes over where I left. I have to focus on finishing my studies right now so I decided to step down now that we've shipped our first techdemo release. In case you're interested in the position check out this article at our blog: http://blog.parpg.net/2010/03/lets-go-surfing/ More screenshots, concept art, renders: http://wiki.parpg.net/Gallery

PARPG: isometric old school 2d RPG - first techdemo available now

11 March 2010 - 02:00 AM

The first techdemo of our post-apocalyptical isometric 2d RPG is available for Linux, Mac, Win32 and all sorts of BSD variants now. Screenshot: PARPG techdemon 1 screenshot Video: PARPG r472 video (slightly older than the released techdemo) Download instructions: http://blog.parpg.net/2010/03/parpg-techdemo-1-finally-available/ More information about the project can be found at our blog: http://blog.parpg.net Right now we're trying to find a new maintainer for the project who takes over where I left. I have to focus on finishing my studies right now so I decided to step down now that we've shipped our first techdemo release. In case you're interested in the position check out this article at our blog: http://blog.parpg.net/2010/03/lets-go-surfing/ More screenshots, concept art, renders: http://wiki.parpg.net/Gallery

Unknown Horizons: isometric 2d economy and strategy game *screenshots*

18 October 2009 - 11:33 PM

Unknown Horizons is a 2D realtime strategy simulation with an emphasis on economy and city building. Expand your small settlement to a strong and wealthy colony, collect taxes and supply your inhabitants with valuable goods. Increase your power with a well balanced economy and with strategic trade and diplomacy. It's an open source undertaking powered by the isometric 2d game engine FIFE. Check out their website at unknown-horizons.org. They released a new version (2009.2) yesterday; precompiled packages are available for Linux and Win32, Macintosh users have to build from source. You can grab the latest release from their download section. Feel free to check out the following screenshots to get an idea what the fuzz is all about: They're also still looking for new contributors to the project, so if you want to lend them a hand as programmer, 2d or 3d graphics artist or gameplay designer, head over to their forums or join their IRC channel and let them know :-) Right now they're especially trying to find: - an AI programmer - a network programmer - additional 3d artists, preferably Blender users

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