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Dunge

Member Since 01 Aug 2000
Offline Last Active Oct 31 2013 11:17 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Freshie!

16 September 2013 - 01:45 PM

You are not advanced enough to take the whole "create a high quality C++ engine using DirectX/OpenGL from scratch" route. This is a route that take years even for an advanced programmer before they get result. You should probably just learn the different possibilities to make games. One would be to use a free existing game engine like Unity and play with it.


In Topic: Stick with C++ or venture into C#?

08 September 2013 - 11:31 AM

Well C# is much much faster the develop than C++ (especially the compilation time) and provide better warning/error messages and provides tools like LinQ to do quick container manipulation that I miss in C++. On the other hand, you can't use every libraries in C#. If you plan to interface directly with DirectX/OpenGL or other C++ libraries you can't except by using wrappers like SharpDX and such. C# code is also easier to hack and disassemble unless you obfuscate it.


In Topic: Spawn Rate Problem

08 August 2013 - 11:57 AM

*deleted*


In Topic: Which Of These 3 API Combinations Would You Advise (GUI's)?

30 July 2013 - 08:31 PM

I would take a look at Qt


In Topic: Win32 vs x64 ?

27 July 2013 - 01:52 PM

Except for people aiming for a very high-tech games engine like let's say CryEngine/Unreal, you probably will never reach the memory limit and the small performance boost advantage is not worth the compatibility/portability issues you will encounter. Almost all games even nowadays are built in 32bits only, and some rare offers both the 32bits and the 64bits executable file, but I don't think I ever saw any game offering only a 64bits version. In any case, you can always switch it anytime to see how it's different during your development.

 

As an exercise, just look on your own computer what's installed in the "Program Files (x86)" (32bits) folder versus the "Program Files" folder (64bits). Most of what is installed in the 64bits version are Microsoft programs, drivers and some high-end applications like Autodesk's ones.


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