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FREE SOFTWARE GIVEAWAY

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Chad Smith

Member Since 26 Jun 2005
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 08:46 PM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: OGRE Bicycles

23 December 2014 - 02:22 PM

 Anyways, not even a simple suspension fork - nothing at all and the frame is bent - I mean look at the weird shape.

 

ogre-14_sv_930x390.jpg

 

 

I think what you're seeing from the frame is the fact that it is a 29er.  Without actually looking the bike up and just look at that image it seems it is like that to keep the bike from being long with it running the larger wheels.

I would take a guess and say that the bike has a sister/brother that runs 26" wheels.


In Topic: OGRE Bicycles

23 December 2014 - 02:12 PM

 


 

A cheap brand mountain bike will cost between 1000 and 2000 $ without doubt. Midtier starts at about 2000$. High price ones go up to maybe 8000-10'000$

Now, for the US you can most probably half this prices (yes, living in switzerland is expensive as hell sad.png ), but still, 1600$ is not an outrageous price for an Mountainbike. Just make sure you really get something for the price (by looking up what other brands bikes with similar components cost)

 

 

 Remind me never to visit if I want to buy a bike.

 Around here there are hundreds of bikes under $250 USD  .

 

While no doubt their are, anyone who is relatively seriously in cycling would not get one.

 

I'm a Triathlete so I wont go into how much we spend on things, though I wouldn't even suggest a friend of mine who will only mountain bike every now and then to get a $250 mountain bike.  I'd almost always suggest at least one that is around $500.  There is a big difference.  From actually using more standard parts (easier to get replacement parts from other people) and being more reliable in general.  Where your cheap $250 mountain bike might be able to survive a local mountain biking trail, chances are pretty high that you would have to replace parts on it more and more.  Plus they don't give you the room to actually move up in difficulty.

 

Though for a mountain bike where you plan to go off road at all I would suggest some type of suspension.  You definitely do not need a full suspension bike, so a hard tail is fine, but I do suggest some type of front suspension.


In Topic: First big game. Which engine and how to handle multiplayer?

06 December 2014 - 11:59 AM

 

Check out phaser for a good javascript game API to create great 2D HTML5 games.

 

As far as multiplayer support, I'm not real sure, but google has tons of examples of making multiplayer games using html5 and javascript.

Thanks, but Phaser doesn't seem to support other platforms like android etc.

I would like to make the game for (all) platforms.

 

Define "doesn't seem to support all platforms."  Do you mean that it doesn't run natively on those said devices and needs to use HTML 5?  If that is what you want, then your engine/framework list just became incredibly small.

 

But other than that Phaser supports mobile browsers just fine.  Matter of fact their website even advertises this as a main feature as they said they designed Phaser from the ground up to deal with Mobile first!  So as long as their browser can run HTML 5 then they should be good to go.


In Topic: Would this be the right way to think about a game

14 October 2014 - 08:29 AM

One thing I've learned about beginning Game Programming: don't think about it too hard. Just start or follow a tutorial to help ha get started. Of you think about it too hard when you're a beginner you will get lost and never get done. Just start and don't worry about things too much. Your first couple games will not have the best code design at all . Just code and finish the game. Take notes about what felt like should had been easier. Can even ask for a code review here. Then in your next game try to implement those details you learned or took note of. If you keep doing this while making simple games before you know it you will have no problem knowing how a game works and how the next game you want to make should work.

In Topic: Did I begin learning late?

02 September 2014 - 09:19 PM

Not even close too old.  Matter of fact, I'd say you are at the perfect age too.

 

I attend a University and I remember in one of my first Computer Science courses there was a guy in his 60's coming back to school just so he could learn programming.  


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