Jump to content

  • Log In with Google      Sign In   
  • Create Account


Inuyashakagome16

Member Since 13 Sep 2005
Offline Last Active Feb 18 2014 09:38 AM

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Displaying Tiles using a Orthographic projection?

02 August 2013 - 03:49 PM

A typical tile is just a square or rectangular quad oriented parallel to a given plane. 

 

So really what I would want is a collection of quads textured, and the orientation changed to be the view I desire?


In Topic: Math and/or Tutorials for Isometric perspective?

31 July 2013 - 08:05 AM

Try Clint Bellanger's isometric math tutorial: http://clintbellanger.net/articles/isometric_math/ (second time this week I've linked to that tutorial! biggrin.png ). That article was the key to my current understanding of isometric perspective/math, and I've used it myself and seen it used in real-world applications, so I can vouch for the accuracy of the information it gives.

 

Wow! That's really easy to understand o.o Thanks!

 

I'm pretty sure that'll do it. biggrin.png It says that it's "Tiles Math" but regardless I think it'll be fine. I'm not sure if what I'm doing will be tiles, or actually what it will be in general. It's just like.. one solid piece of land. And I would generate a new one each level.

 

EDIT: Also referencing what FLeBlanc said about orthogonal projection, when I look up anything about Isometric perspective and changing the camera with XNA that always comes up now. So maybe what I want is a tutorial for projection? 


In Topic: Math and/or Tutorials for Isometric perspective?

30 July 2013 - 12:21 PM

An isometric perspective is simply a camera set to orthogonal projection, oriented at an angle above the horizon (commonly 30 degrees, for the famed 2:1 ratio, or ~35 for true isometric; other common perspectives exist) and 45 degrees around the vertical. That is all there is to it, these days. In the old 2D days you had to do some weird tricks, but there is just no point in them anymore.

 

I kind of understand what you're saying. I'm reading up on different perspectives and it's starting to make more sense so hopefully I can get the information I need and apply it. :) Thanks!

 

 

Im currently building an isometric tilemap. 

 

Try to do most of it yourself, but this page will give you all of the math and "click on map" to tile conversion. 

http://www.xnaresources.com/default.asp?page=Tutorial:TileEngineSeries:4

 

*Update: Ohhh, sorry thought you were doing a isometric tilemap. Anyways, ill leave this post in, in case someone else will find it useful. 

 

I actually went through most of that tutorial set looking for what I was trying to do but couldn't really find much. :( It did help me understand tiles though!


In Topic: Completly new

24 March 2013 - 08:44 PM

 

Get yourself a good IDE/compiler, c++ book and add several c++ reference sites to your bookmarks.  Learn c++ before trying to learn 3d.  You will be making console applications for quite some time.

 

Some examples

IDE ( free, windows only ) Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 express for windows desktop ( ships with microsoft compiler )

IDE ( free, cross platform ) QtCreator ( ships with mingw compiler on windows )

Book The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference (2nd Edition)

Reference www.cppreference.com  www.msdn.com www.cplusplus.com

 

Eventually when you get good at programming you'll want to get a book on a graphics API, you have 2 choices for low level api on windows, openGL or DirectX.  OpenGL runs everywhere 3d graphics is needed, and directx is windows only.  Other platforms only use openGL.

 

good book on openGL

OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide to Learning OpenGL, Version 4.3 (8th Edition)

 

good book on directx

Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11 ( Frank Luna )

 

All the above books can be found on amazon.

Also XNA is a good library to use. DX and OpenGL aren't.. really beginner friendly.

He says he want's to know c++.  So no xna.

 

True. I just wasn't sure if learning C++ as a first language would be.. good. I'm not saying he should but rather suggesting that it might be better to start else where. But you're links for OpenGL and DX are very reliable (as a side note) thanks!


In Topic: Completly new

24 March 2013 - 04:44 PM

Get yourself a good IDE/compiler, c++ book and add several c++ reference sites to your bookmarks.  Learn c++ before trying to learn 3d.  You will be making console applications for quite some time.

 

Some examples

IDE ( free, windows only ) Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 express for windows desktop ( ships with microsoft compiler )

IDE ( free, cross platform ) QtCreator ( ships with mingw compiler on windows )

Book The C++ Standard Library: A Tutorial and Reference (2nd Edition)

Reference www.cppreference.com  www.msdn.com www.cplusplus.com

 

Eventually when you get good at programming you'll want to get a book on a graphics API, you have 2 choices for low level api on windows, openGL or DirectX.  OpenGL runs everywhere 3d graphics is needed, and directx is windows only.  Other platforms only use openGL.

 

good book on openGL

OpenGL Programming Guide: The Official Guide to Learning OpenGL, Version 4.3 (8th Edition)

 

good book on directx

Introduction to 3D Game Programming with DirectX 11 ( Frank Luna )

 

All the above books can be found on amazon.

Also XNA is a good library to use. DX and OpenGL aren't.. really beginner friendly.


PARTNERS