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Tom Sloper

Member Since 20 Jan 2006
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 11:44 PM

#5308497 Masters Degree in Video game design

Posted by on 29 August 2016 - 10:28 AM

My question was more like from where to start in order to transition to something like [idea guy]


With any job. Just get into the game industry.
http://sloperama.com/advice/m85.htm
And the other FAQs


#5308077 Masters Degree in Video game design

Posted by on 26 August 2016 - 12:50 PM

Lachezar, your post has been moved to the Game Industry Job Advice forum. It's recommended
that you read the FAQs here.
Go back out to the Breaking In forum main page, and look for the FAQ link at upper right.
URL: http://www.gamedev.net/page/reference/faq.php/_/breaking-into-the-industry-r16


#5307743 Trying to get into commercial composing. How much should I charge for my music?

Posted by on 24 August 2016 - 07:28 PM

I know I don't have the best samples; but I think I'm a pretty decent composer.


Your opinion isn't what counts - it's the opinion of your potential customers that counts. And
the way to influence that opinion is with the best samples. So keep improving your samples.


#5307741 Xenorf The Dragon

Posted by on 24 August 2016 - 07:24 PM

I wanted to present my Character

To whom? For what purpose?


#5307520 I have an Idea..........

Posted by on 23 August 2016 - 09:36 PM

I really want to create an MMO, RTS, RPG game based on the anime Log Horizon.

Don't do it without permission of the IP owner.

I am fairly new to all this programming stuff

Then the IP owner won't give you permission to use their intellectual property.


#5307308 My College Dilemma

Posted by on 22 August 2016 - 07:56 PM

As of now a Game Design program seems the best for me, despite the opinions out there.


Have you read those FAQs yet?


#5307063 Is the Bay Area affordable for entry level designers?

Posted by on 21 August 2016 - 01:55 PM

EDIT: I do want to thank everyone for their advice of course! I'm obviously leaning hard on the bay for reasons beyond just game dev, but am always considering my plan B or C. My "worst" case scenario is I end up in someplace like Austin, which wouldn't be so bad I have enough money saved up to account for a fallback move.


You have a good head on your shoulders. It CAN work. It's just that it's tricky, and there are a lot of
moving parts you'll need to nail down as you run into them. Good luck!


#5306950 Sensible places to look for work with 1 year Unity experience

Posted by on 20 August 2016 - 08:39 PM

Yes, it counts. Stop taking calls from recruiters, and find your own job. Companies don't like to hire
junior people through recruiters - costs extra. Recruiters are okay for highly experienced people.


#5306823 Would You Like Fires With That? (Business Logic)

Posted by on 19 August 2016 - 07:28 PM

And BTW, I would like some fires to go with the marshmallows I'm buying! :)


#5306645 Taxes management for flash games

Posted by on 18 August 2016 - 06:23 PM

The money won't be converted "freely" (in that there will be exchange fees). If you make any money, yes,
you'll have to pay taxes in Lithuania. There are several ways one can make taxable income. You mentioned
"money from job." That's taxable, of course. If you make money from your game, that's business income,
and that too is taxable. Assuming Lithuania's tax laws work the way most countries' tax laws work.


#5306091 Is the Bay Area affordable for entry level designers?

Posted by on 15 August 2016 - 11:25 PM

Or make more friends, get a place that's less than $3000 a month (apparently that's what your
friend has), unless there are at least 3 or 4 people living in it. Work out the numbers, using
that 30% guideline.
If you start in QA, you might make around $30K. That's $2500 a month before taxes, so $750 is
a bit high but probably manageable.
If you make around $40K, don't pay more than $1,000 a month.
If you do get $50K, don't pay more than $1,250.


#5305527 Wild West MMO/RPG

Posted by on 12 August 2016 - 01:02 PM

basically a MMO/RPG with the same operatives and objectives as GTA V and Red Dead but with the help and of
Frostbite and DICE to pitch in with the mechanics and game engines.


On second thought, I'm not so sure your post is indeed about the game's design. You wrote about the
background and genre and textures, without much about the gameplay: the play mechanics. But the quoted part
here, about getting two well-known companies involved in your concept - not sure what that is, except
maybe unrealistic dreaming. You need to compartmentalize your thinking. The game's design describes the
events and player choices and the player's goal. The art design describes the art style and the art tools
and mentions exemplars. The business plan is entirely separate, and you shouldn't plan to get multiple
different companies to partner up in a grand mishmosh of developers. One company will develop the game,
but you can't plan what company that will be. You need to decide the monetization method, and thus the
first platform, for your concept.

You say your idea is in 3 paragraphs (I assume you did not give us those 3 paragraphs here). 3 paragraphs
is not a standard concept size. You need to create a logline, an elevator pitch, a 2-page concept, and a
treatment of 10-20 pages. No need to commit to a full GDD until someone is interested in investing in the
game based on the treatment.

BTW, you probably misused the word "experience." The industry defines experience as having held a job in
the industry.

And lastly, you misused the word "posse." A posse, in wild west terms, is a group of temporarily deputized men aiding a law
enforcement officer in hunting down some criminals. A group of men involved in criminal enterprise is
usually called a "gang."


#5305338 Life as a Tools Engineer ( in game development )?

Posted by on 11 August 2016 - 10:28 AM

Another way to get a life without crunch is to change not just roles but companies. There are companies
that have anti-crunch lifestyles.


#5305327 Starting Something In The Future

Posted by on 11 August 2016 - 09:07 AM

Suppose baddest things happen, and windows becomes windows-store only,


Why suppose something so unlikely? Stop horriblizing and get to work!


#5304660 What Would You Do If...

Posted by on 08 August 2016 - 08:07 AM

I should state up front that I have not read everything in this entire thread. I've read the first few posts so far. Primarily, I'm responding to the initial post.
It's possible someone else has already said everything I say.

a simulation design that is indistinguishable from what we all know as "The Matrix", without the human/organic components of course.
... Just try telling someone that you have invented The Matrix and see what their reaction is.


First off, what do you mean by "the matrix"? You assume everybody defines that the same way. Is it what Hodgman said, "a full quantum/atomic-scale simulation of a world..."? But even more than that? A simulation of a universe, not just in a moment of time but throughout all time? You need to express what the matrix is, in ways anyone can grasp quickly. Work to compress the idea into an elevator pitch (about 45 seconds' worth, which is approximately 112 words). Actually, you need two elevator pitches - one to explain what the matrix is, and one to explain what the 12-game series is.

As computer games. Twelve of them, in an epic sci-fo gaming "Universe" that tells the story of humanity from the formation of the earth to the day that the sun explodes... and spent 25 years working on it without ever finding a way to make it.


In those 25 years, has it occurred to you that this idea is kind of grandiose, and hugely expensive? The game industry exists because games have made money. Are you sure your game series would be enjoyable for millions of people to play? I assume you are convinced of it, but the classic problem is to convince publishers or investors that the risk is worth it. It's a good thing that the idea can be broken down into a dozen products. If the first game can be successful in the marketplace, then you can make a case for doing the second one. And so on. Lucas' Star Wars series began with one movie. He may have had a grandiose series in his mind all along, but it was the success of the first one that enabled the creation of the others.

even the few scientists that I know are at a loss to comprehend this because it is not their field.


Why talk about this with scientists?

I have yet to find a single person who is interested in this at all, almost certainly because everyone I try and ask about it immediately assumes that I am crazy. Try telling someone you can make The Matrix and see what happens... Yeah...


It's just because you don't express the grandiosity of the concept in ways that inspires interest and confidence in your ability to deliver. Everybody has ideas for games. Few can pitch their ideas in ways that convince others to invest the money and resources, and the risk to business reputation. Even fewer who can do that have the chops necessary to go along with it.

So, what would you do if you discovered how to create "The Matrix", and knew for certain it worked


It depends. I had an idea for a game about all of human history, but the more I worked on the concept, I became aware of the tremendous time and cost it would entail. And I wasn't sure (how can anyone be sure) that it would be popular. Your idea is even bigger than that - I don't know how you managed to distill it down to 12 games. I certainly didn't spend 25 years on the idea (and it has been more than 25 years since I had the idea).

Who do you tell? Who would listen to such a thing (people at Universities don't answer back).


If telling people is unsatisfactory, why keep telling people?

How do you get to make your revolutionary games where there is nobody else who realizes that they are revolutionary games?


That is always the problem. I wrote an article on this. I call it "FAQ 31: The Ultimate Idea." http://www.sloperama.com/advice/lesson31.htm

Who do you take this too?


It depends on what you hope to achieve. If you mean "how do I pitch it so it'll be made," I wrote an article on that too. It's FAQ 21 (I'm skipping FAQs 11 and 1). You say your profession is simulation design? A solid résumé and track record should help. But as I said before, you need to scale back, and pitch just one game (that can be made for under $20MM).

So who do you tell when you've accidentally made a functioning scientific modeling simulation of a god?


It depends on what you want or expect that person to do with the information.




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