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nsmadsen

Member Since 22 Feb 2006
Offline Last Active Yesterday, 09:42 AM

#5218790 Introduction: Looking for answers

Posted by nsmadsen on 24 March 2015 - 09:38 AM


Would you recommend doing unpaid jobs if (an only if) that's the ONLY way of getting a proper portfolio?

 

Nope, I wouldn't. I'd recommend REALLY cheap jobs instead because at least then there's still an exchange happening. Working for free just hurts the overall impression of audio people's worth.

 

Edit: Start cheap to build up some credentials and experience. Then raise your rates. Don't fall for the "this will be huge exposure" line that some devs throw out there because, too often, the game isn't nearly as successful as they think/hope. And that's if the game is even finished!




#5218786 New article is now up!

Posted by nsmadsen on 24 March 2015 - 09:36 AM

Here's a new article which focuses on how clients also need to impress freelancers:

http://madsenstudios.com/impressed-denver-composer-sound-designer-nathan-madsenstudios/

 

It's full of tips and examples which can serve both as a reminder to freelancers and helpful tips to clients as to what to avoid!

 

Hope it's helpful.

 

Nate




#5218756 Introduction: Looking for answers

Posted by nsmadsen on 24 March 2015 - 08:13 AM


I am curious about the "gving talk" part. If you're a beginner and most importantly not in the industry who really wants to ear your talk? I mean, I just started in the industry and I don't feel like I am "legit" enough to give talks.

 

Not each thing I listed can be started right way, obviously. To a degree, I STILL feel this way after ten years and 150+ projects. But there are certainly things I've learned along the way that others would (I hope) like to hear about. And CCH is right, if you're landing work and getting paid for it, have finished at least one game then folks who are just looking to get started would most likely be interested!




#5218536 [COMPETITION] Enter to win 200GB (!) of royalty-free sound FX from Sonniss

Posted by nsmadsen on 23 March 2015 - 12:28 PM

This is all cool and stuff, but I really need to know how many fart sounds the library has. I mean, I'm hoping for at least a good 20-30 gigs worth.

 

:P




#5218535 Introduction: Looking for answers

Posted by nsmadsen on 23 March 2015 - 12:27 PM


Could anyone tell me what I am doing wrong?

Is it there any strategy to follow when looking for projects?

 

You're not doing anything wrong per say, but cold emailing is easy to ignore. It's, as others have said, hard to stand out when it's just an email. I do cold emailing (to some degree) myself but it's not the only part of my networking strategy. In fact, it's probably the smallest amount because of the low ROI. So add in meeting face to face with people, attending conferences, giving talks, doing tutorial videos, taking part in online communities (like GD.net) and really creating relationships with clients (via social networks, etc).

 

People hire their friends before hiring complete strangers.




#5217779 How many songs should I put in an album?

Posted by nsmadsen on 19 March 2015 - 05:39 PM

12,000 tracks.

 

:P

 

Of course, I'm kidding. Instead, I'd be more concerned with:

 

- what is the message(s) of the album?

- how many songs can fulfil that message?

- what's a good amount of songs to give the album enough value that people would want to buy it?

- how long will it take to create/produce all of those tracks and when do I expect to release the album?

- etc

 

I've never set out to say an album would be X amount of tracks. Instead, I just wrote and kept working on it until it felt complete to me.




#5215899 Chaos of Cthulhu

Posted by nsmadsen on 11 March 2015 - 02:00 PM

Ha!

 

I always allow folks to share their work! It just so happens that this work is a kickstarter video.




#5215872 Chaos of Cthulhu

Posted by nsmadsen on 11 March 2015 - 12:01 PM

Hey everyone,

 

Here's a kickstarter that I had the pleasure of scoring:

 

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/144039181/chaos-of-cthulhu?ref=video

 

This is game related just not video game related... :P It's a strategy dice game based on the Cthulhu mythos. Check it out if you can!

 

Thanks,

 

Nate




#5211246 Looking for a uncomfortable background noise

Posted by nsmadsen on 17 February 2015 - 01:14 PM

Or even better, hire a sound designer on here to make that sound for you!




#5211029 Another article is now up

Posted by nsmadsen on 16 February 2015 - 01:33 PM

Exactly! We all lose perspective when we're really close to a project.




#5210983 Another article is now up

Posted by nsmadsen on 16 February 2015 - 09:02 AM

Here you go: http://madsenstudios.com/hmmm-stew/

 

This one focuses on letting your audio sit and "stew" for a bit before declaring it done. Not as much of a problem for most folks when starting out but it can become an issue when actively freelancing.




#5210980 Chiptune softwares

Posted by nsmadsen on 16 February 2015 - 09:00 AM

In addition to the free collections or doing it yourself, there's this commercial library: http://www.plogue.com/products/chipsounds/ I used it on the Hot Tin Roof game soundtrack.




#5210297 Looking for critique on my new RPG forest theme...

Posted by nsmadsen on 12 February 2015 - 10:38 AM

Great comments by all!

 

I'd suggest stating the melody by itself the first time. You have a nice counter melody or idea happening, at 12 seconds in, which occurs every time the melody is heard. Why not state the melody without that the first time? Then bring in the counter melody later on. This will create some more space and give more evolution to your piece.




#5208919 Why not chord tones?

Posted by nsmadsen on 05 February 2015 - 01:09 PM

In my quest to learn composing simple game music I thought I should study some old Mario songs because the simplicity of never having more than 3 notes at the same time

 

When looking at old chip tune music, you really should consider any technological limitations at that time. The NES could stream four channels and one was used for both music and SFX (which is why some of the music would drop out if you were getting a lot of coins at one time). So that really left three channels of steady music streaming. The composers at this time knew all of the limitations and wrote music to accomodate those limits.




#5208918 Resources for music theory and composition?

Posted by nsmadsen on 05 February 2015 - 01:05 PM

Go to a used college book store and see if you can get a freshman level music theory text book, preferably with a workbook that isn't filled out yet. Read through things and do all of the assignments. Also get together with another group of musicians as soon as you can on trumpet. I've found the more you play music, the easier it is to apply and learn more about the theory behind things.

 

Have fun!






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