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    • By Gas Lantern Games
      Hello!

      I have spent the last year and a half developing a game in my spare time in Unity! I am releasing it soon on Steam. Ant Empire is a strategic remake of some older games. It is influenced by games such as Ant Empire and Civilization.

      I am currently doing a kickstarter to help fund an AI before launch.

      I have attached some images (tried some gifs but they were too large) to show the current stage of Ant Empire, which is nearly completed.







    • By MarkNefedov
      So, initially I was planning to create a base class, and some inherited classes like weapon/armour/etc, and each class will have an enum that specifies its type, and everything was going ok until I hit "usable items".
      I ended up with creating UsableItem class, and tons of inherited classes, like Drink/Apple/SuperApple/MagickPotato/Potion/Landmine/(whatever that player can use) each with unique behaviour. I planned to store items in the SQLite database, but I discovered that there are not many ways of creating variables(pointers) with type determined at runtime (that preferably get their stats/model/icon/etc from DB). So, I think that I need to use some variation of the Factory pattern, but I have no idea how I should implement it for this particular case (giant switch/case 😂 ).
      It would be really nice if you guys can give me some advice on how I should manage this kind of problem or maybe how I should redesign the inventory.
      Inventory storage is an array of pointers. I'm working with CryEngine V, so RTTI can't be used.
      Example code:
      namespace Inventory { enum ItemType { Static, Building, Usable, Weapon, Armour }; class InventoryItem { public: virtual ~InventoryItem() = default; virtual ItemType GetType() = 0; virtual string GetName() = 0; virtual string GetIcon() = 0; virtual void Destroy() { //TODO: Notify inventory storage delete this; } }; class UsableItem : public InventoryItem { public: struct Usage { int Index; string Use_Name; }; virtual CryMT::vector<Usage> GetUsages() = 0; virtual void UseItem(int usage) = 0; }; class TestItem : public UsableItem { int Counter =0; ItemType GetType() override { return ItemType::Usable; } string GetName() override { return "TestItem"; } string GetIcon() override { return "NULL"; } CryMT::vector<Usage> GetUsages() override { CryMT::vector<Usage> Usages; Usages.push_back(Usage{1, "Dec"}); Usages.push_back(Usage{2,"Inc"}); Usages.push_back(Usage{3,"Show"}); return Usages; } void UseItem(int usage) override { CryMT::vector<Usage> uses = GetUsages(); switch (usage) { case 0: for (int i =0; i<uses.size(); i++) { CryLog(uses[i].Use_Name); } break; case 1: Counter--; CryLog("Dec"); CryLog("%d", Counter); break; case 2: Counter++; CryLog("Inc"); CryLog("%d", Counter); break; case 3: CryLog("%d", Counter); break; default: CryLog("WRONG INDEX"); break; } } }; }  
    • By Effekseer
      Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on September 13,
      I released "Effekseer 1.4," which is the latest major version release. 
      Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others.
      With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particle simply by specifying different parameters.
      Effekseer's effect creation tool works on Windows and macOS.
      The created visual effects can be viewed on Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS, Android and other environments with DirectX, OpenGL and so on.
      In addition, there are plugins / libraries for game engines such as Unity and UnrealEngine4 to view visual effects.
      Effekseer 1.4 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.3 released in November 2017.
      This update contains the following changes:
      The renewal of UI. Support the tool for macOS. Addition of a function to read FBX with animation. Addition of parameters to protect collied effects and objects. Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addtion I improve plugins/libraries for Unity, UnrealEngine4 and Cocos2d-x.
      Besides that, more than 40 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed.
      Effekseer 1.4 is available on the project website.
      The license for the software is the MIT license.
      Effekseer 
      http://effekseer.github.io/

      Github
      https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer
      
      Sample Effects.
      Tool Demo
       

      View full story
    • By Effekseer
      Effekseer Project develops "Effekseer," which is visual software for creating open source games; on September 13,
      I released "Effekseer 1.4," which is the latest major version release. 
      Effekseer is a tool to create various visual effects used in games and others.
      With Effekseer, you can easily create various visual effects such as explosion, light emission, and particle simply by specifying different parameters.
      Effekseer's effect creation tool works on Windows and macOS.
      The created visual effects can be viewed on Windows, macOS, Linux, iOS, Android and other environments with DirectX, OpenGL and so on.
      In addition, there are plugins / libraries for game engines such as Unity and UnrealEngine4 to view visual effects.
      Effekseer 1.4 is an updated version of Effekseer 1.3 released in November 2017.
      This update contains the following changes:
      The renewal of UI. Support the tool for macOS. Addition of a function to read FBX with animation. Addition of parameters to protect collied effects and objects. Addition of parameters for easier control of the effects. In addtion I improve plugins/libraries for Unity, UnrealEngine4 and Cocos2d-x.
      Besides that, more than 40 new sample effects have been added and many bugs have been fixed.
      Effekseer 1.4 is available on the project website.
      The license for the software is the MIT license.
      Effekseer 
      http://effekseer.github.io/

      Github
      https://github.com/effekseer/Effekseer
      
      Sample Effects.
      Tool Demo
       
    • By year_of_jubilee
      How the heck would I know if I'd make a good game designer?
       
      (I like me some words, so if you feel like skimming, basic stuff is in bold-italics lol):
       
      Story Time: I've played video games since I was five and my dad forced me to play Ready 2 Rumble with him--it all seemed such a fuss until Afro Thunder burst in and stole my heart. Fast forward to middle school and I started picking out games on my own--mostly RPGs with some fighting and strategy and Mario and blessed Harvest Moon mixed in. Some puzzles. Adventure point-and-clicks? To die for. So I stumble through yada yada life yada yada high school yada yada want to be a writer yada yada college yada yada piddle around with game design yada yada. Got a creative degree that wasn’t games-related. Wrote a few CYOA for an app, published some writing, and kept journals and journals of game design ideas. Studied coding and art on the side. Now I'm considering Grad School at SMU Guildhall. School says my credentials are good, so that’s not my problem.
       
      Here’s my problem:
       
      Dudes, I'm not very skilled at video games.
       
      I played my first MMO ever yesterday with a 2-week-old character and totally sucked at the group play. Like, I got performance anxiety. Bad. Thank God I was a low-level or I would have felt like even more of an arse. Buttons weren't doing what I thought they should; fences were not being jumped over; healing (Lord, I was the healer) was few and far in-between. Um, guys, I couldn't even get the revive button to work. I don't even get test anxiety, but I was having flash backs to high school track and field and they were a bit not good. (*´=∀=) I was the first one to die and everyone ended up waiting on me at the beginning of the level because I thought I was literally just playing with my real-life friend and not two additional strangers--both of whom must have had the patience of saints and the vocabulary of sailors to get through that awful flashpoint. (ノ∀゚*) [Will I regret going into this much detail? Probably. Stick around for lolz].
       
      On one level, being a newb is completely hilarious and inevitable. On another--I just felt deflated. I thought--is is too little, too late? Despite playing games all my life I've never been competitive or cared about the nitty-gritty details of memorizing maps, coming in with gear, chatting with other people on the internet (**shudder**). I'm literally more comfortable giving speeches and talking on the phone with sales people than I am with chatting with fellow players online. Even chat forums are a stretch for me. (Heh).
       
      So, can you be a good game designer while being a mediocre to middling player? How important is it to cater to competitive and multiplayer-based players? Does anybody else get multiplayer anxiety? I’m not a casual player per se--I just enjoy narrative experiences and quick matches (like in fighting games) more than party-based stuff. (As a disclaimer, I could actually see how FUN the MMO parties could be--if I knew what I was doing. But the idea of holding people back while looking like an imbecile who can’t use a mouse is mortifying--even if it is anonymous mortification xD).
       
      Thanks in advance for those who read through (or read all, bless you) of this post. Also, if you’ve been to school for game design and wouldn’t mind sharing what you knew beforehand or wish you’d known beforehand, that’d be great.  All I know is I'm going to do the flashpoint again, to just get over the jitters, and hope I get to mastering it a bit. I like the gaming community--but, weirdly enough, it scares the daylights out of me. 
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