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    What can you generally find from a city?

    Game Design and Theory

    GameDev.net

    What can you generally find from a city?
    by U23910@UICVM.bitnet

    Awhile back someone asked for detailed info on cities. Well, I have a listing of everything every encounted in a city by myself and the groups I have gamed with. This could get long.....

     FOOD & LODGING                          MERCANTILE
       Eatery/Resturaunt                       Market (General)
       Tavern                                  Livestock market
       Club                                    Slave market
       Hostel                                  Bazaar
       Inn                                     Auction block
    
     MECHANTS/FINISHED GOODS
       Rare woods              Imported goods              Trinkets/curios
       Ink                     Dice                        Sweets/candy
       Maps                    Books                       Toys
       Furs                    Magic items/Charms          Hardware/Tools
       Spices                  Firewood                    Soap
       Herbs                   Glass                       Perfumes
       Paper                   Leather goods               Pets/Familiars
       Ceramics                Jewlery                     Brooms
       Charcoal                Musical Instruments         Cloth
       Rope                    Wool                        Cosmetics
       Linen                   Mirrors                     Games
       Pipes/Tobacco           Gifts                       Wigs
       Whips                   Furniture                   Saddles
       Rugs/Tapestries         Nets                        Flowers
       Artworks                Sundials                    Costumes
       Potions                 Livestock                   Slaves
       Religious items         Novelties                   Antiques
       Miniatures/Figurines    Coins                       Candles
       Bait & tackle           Ships supplies              Apothocary
    
     CRAFTSMEN
       Cutler                  Weaver                      Furniture carver
       Tinker                  Limner/Painter              Haberdasher/Hatter
       Alchemist               Clothier                    Cobbler/Shoemaker
       Metal worker            Carpenter                   Distiller
       Mason                   Potter                      Leather worker
       Goldsmith               Whitesmith                  Silversmith
       Blacksmith              Dyer                        Herbalist
       Seal maker              Roofer                      Exterminator
       Lauderer                Artificer/Mechanician       Taxidermist
       Artist                  Sculptor                    Fuller
       Wheelwright             Butcher                     Cooper
       Locksmith               Thacther                    Woodcarver
       Bonecarver              Gemcutter                   Chandler
       Cartwright              Tanner                      Shipwright
       Wainwright              Bookbinder                  Porcilinist
       Fine metal worker       Glassblower                 Farrier
    
     SERVICES
       Teamster                Sage                        Marshall
       Realtor                 Lawyer                      Dentist
       Hunter                  Healer                      Astrologer
       Undertaker              Surgeon                     Animal trainer
       Astronomer              Scribe                      Nusremaid
       Trapper                 Teacher                     Tatooer
       Spelunker               Mountianeer                 Navigator
       Miner                   Messenger                   Massage
       Hypnotist               Guide                       Fortune teller
       Concubines              Forester                    Fence
       Surveyor                Recriuter                   Hawkmaster
       Copier                  Translator                  Mystic
       Arbiter                 Cartographer
    
     FOOD & DRINK
       Wine                    Meats/Butchery              Foodstuffs
       Bakery                  Fish                        Dairy goods
       Brewery                 Smokehouse                  Ale
       General food & drink    Fine food & drink           Grain
       Liquor                  Cheese                      Beer
       Fresh food
    
     STORAGE
       Warehouse               Stable                      Kennel
       Mews                    Silo
    
     ENTERTAINMENT
       Theater                 Museum                      Stadium
       Ampitheater             Circus                      Gynasium
       Fairground              Tourement field
    
     ENTERPRISES
       Pawnshop                Foundry                     Trader/General store
       Lumber                  Construction company        Brothel
       Rentals                 Zoo                         Greenhouse
       Laundry                 Casino                      Bank
       Nursery                 Mill                        Moneylender
       Smelters                Training school
    
     CIVIC
       Censor                  Baths                       Clinic
       Hospital                Mayor's home                Town hall
       Mint                    Library                     Sherrif
       Watch tower             Meeting hall                Guard headquarters
       Jail                    Prison                      Asylum
       Treasury                School                      University
       Archives                Park                        Cavalry stable
       Civil court             Criminal court              Bureaucrat
       Tax collector           Toll collector              Palace
       Punishment square       Barracks                    Customs
       Executioner
    
     GUILDS
       Rangers                 Sailors                     Merchants
       Fighters                Alchemists                  Entertainers
       Wizards                 Fishermen                   Caravaners
       Metalworkers            Mercinaries                 Slavers
       Artists                 (Smugglers)                 Astrologers
       Carpenters              Jewellers                   Tailors
       (Thieves)               (Assassins)                 Wainwrights
       Shipwrights             Apothecaries                Physicians
       Stonemasons             Moneylenders/-changers      Barristers
       Artificers              Steersmen & navigators      Messengers/Heralds
       Blacksmiths             Armorers & weaponsmakers    Coutesans
    
     HOUSING                 RELIGIOUS                   MISCELLANY
       Boarding house          Temple                      Lighthouse
       Home                    Monastary                   Monument/Monolith
       Estate                  Shrine                      Citadel
       Apartments              Abbey                       Icehouse
       Flophouse/shelter                                   Embassy
       Mansion
    
     ARMOR & WEAPONS         IMPORTANT PEOPLE
       Armor                   Wizard
       Sheilds                 Witch
       Bowyer                  Ambassador
       Fletcher
       Weapons
       Fine weapons
       Armor repair
    

    And this is not a complete list, either! I can now think of several things that have been left off, but these are all things that we have encounted while adventuring in urban settings. I'm sure you can think of several more.



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