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    • By Yoshirouuu
      I have an LCVP project and I need to ask someone from the games Industry some questions regarding the industry and the job/workplace, If anyone can help please reply or hit me up on discord Yoshirouuu#7378
    • By Jastiv
      Many years ago, my husband had a co-worker who used to work in the games industry.  Apparently he got an exciting position as an alpha tester for games.  He had to move all the way out of California.  He tested games, but apparently, he wasn't paid enough to afford to live there, so he had to move back to New England when the money ran out.
      I'm not really sure who befitted from that arrangement, the guy, surely not, after all he didn't end up making any money and just lost it while playing incomplete buggy games.  The company, well, they paid an awful lot so someone could live in a high cost to live area, instead of being able to support someone living in a lower cost area. 
      Surely there is a better way to get alpha testers for games now than this lose/lose arrangement.
    • By dandoherty94
      Hi all,
      I'm looking for a career change as the job that i currently do is neither a passion or something that i really want to be doing for the rest of my life. I would ideally like to begin a career in the gaming industry as like most others i have a strong passion for gaming and all things related. I have been looking into a junior test analyst QA job and was wondering if this is the correct place to start. I'm a dedicated worker so don't mind working my way up and I love being hands on with things. I was wondering if anyone had any advice regarding this or how i can go about gaining experience in this field to give myself the best chance. I'm more than willing to do either weekend work or free work to get my foot in the door so if there is any advice or help anyone could give me that would be great. 
      Thanks for reading,
      Dan 
    • By FedGuard
      Hello all,
       
      I would like to start off with thanking you all for this community. Without fora like these to assist people the already hard journey to making an own game would be exponentially more difficult. Next I would like to apologize for the long post, in advance...
      I am contemplating making a game. There, now that's out of the way, maybe some further details might be handy.
      I am not some youngster (no offence) with dreams of breaking into the industry, I am 38, have a full-time job, a wife, kid and dog so I think I am not even considered indie? However I recently found myself with additional time on my hands and decided I would try my hand at making a game.Why? Well mostly because I would like to contribute something, also because I think I have a project worth making (and of course some extra income wouldn't hurt either to be honest). The first thing I realized was, I have absolutely no relevant skill or experience. Hmm; ok, never mind, we can overcome that, right?
      I have spent a few months "researching",meaning looking at YouTube channels, reading articles and fora. Needless to say, I am more confused now than when I started. I also bought some courses (Blender, Unity, C#) and set out to make my ideas more concrete.
      I quickly discovered, I am definitely not an artist... So I decided, though I do plan to continue learning the art side eventually, I would focus on the design and development phase first. The idea being, if it takes me a year or more solely learning stuff and taking courses without actually working on my game, I would become demoralized and the risk of quitting would increase.
      So I thought I would:
      1: Keep following the courses Unity and C# while starting on the actual game development as the courses and my knowledge progress.
      2: Acquire some artwork to help me get a connection with the game and main character, and have something to helm keep me motivated. (I already did some contacting and realized this will not be cheap...). Also try to have the main character model so I can use it to start testing the initial character and game mechanics. For this I have my first concrete question. I already learned that outsourcing this will easily run up in the high hundreds or thousands of dollars... (lowest offer so far being 220 USD) I am therefore playing with the idea of purchasing https://assetstore.unity.com/packages/3d/animations/medieval-animations-mega-pack-12141 with the intention of then have an artist alter and/or add to the animations (it is for a Roman character so some shield animations are not going to work the same way.). This way I could start  with the basic character mechanics. Is this a good idea, waste of money,...? Any suggestions? I then have a related but separate question. Is it a good idea to buy Playmaker (or some other similar software I haven't yet heard of like RPGAIO), and using this for initial build, then changing/adding code as the need arises?
      3.Get a playable initial level ready as a rough demo and then starting to look for artist for level design and character/prop creation.
      ...
       
      I would really appreciate some input from more experienced people, and especially answers to my questions. Of course any advice is extremely welcome.
    • By Shaarigan
      Hey,
      I'm currently starting next iteration on my engine project and have some points I'm completely fine with and some other points and/or code parts that need refactoring so this is a refactoring step before starting to add new features. As I want my code to be modular to have features optional installed for certain projects while others have to stay out of sight, I designed a framework that starting from a core component or module, spreads features to several project files that are merged together to a single project solution (in Visual Studio) by our tooling.
      This works great for some parts of the code, naming the Crypto or Input module for example but other parts seem to be at the wrong place and need to be moved. Some features are in the core component that may belong into an own module while I feel uncomfortable splitting those parts and determine what stays in core and what should get it's own module. An example is Math stuff. When using the framework to write a game (engine), I need access to algebra like Vector, Quaternion and Matrix objects but when writing some kind of match-making server, I wouldn't need it so put it into an own module with own directory, build script and package description or just stay in core and take the size and ammount of files as a treat in this case?
      What about naimng? When cleaning the folder structure I want to collect some files together that stay seperated currently. This files are foir example basic type definitions, utility macros and parts of my Reflection/RTTI/Meta system (which is intended to get ipartially t's own module as well because I just need it for editor code currently but supports conditional building to some kind of C# like attributes also).
      I already looked at several projects and they seem to don't care that much about that but growing the code means also grow breaking changes when refactoring in the future. So what are your suggestions/ oppinions to this topic? Do I overcomplicate things and overengeneer modularity or could it even be more modular? Where is the line between usefull and chaotic?
      Thanks in advance!
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