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About this blog

Announcements, stories and industry interest posts for users of Corona, the 2D game engine from Corona Labs.

Entries in this blog

 

Great game design tips: the art of color

Color — or even a lack of color — impacts every game ever created. Color is one of the primary emotional cues a designer can use to set the mood of a game and thus the player. In fact, understanding how to use color properly could be the difference between a hit app or one that gets almost no downloads. In this roundup, let’s look at several resources which discuss the topic of color in game design. Screenshots from BotHeads. Screenshot from Limbo. 1. The Most Important Color In UI Design In this post by Nick Babich, a software developer with a passion for UI/UX design, he discusses why the color blue is so popular in UI design and why it’s used in many mobile apps. From emotional reasons to technical reasons, he outlines several reasons why you should use blue. 2. Color in games: An in-depth look at one of game design’s most useful tools In this article from Gamasutra, Herman Tulleken and Jonathan Bailey take a deep dive into the purpose color serves in games. Not only do they show how games use color to brand themselves, they get into discussions about the emotion of color and how it’s used as signifiers and identifiers. This article will certainly make you think about color and its impact! 3. Picking a Color Palette for Your Game’s Artwork In this article, Tyler Seitz discusses color palettes and how to create them, along with some basic color theory that every game developer should understand.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Tomorrow is GDPR day. Are you ready?

Tomorrow, May 25th, the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) becomes legally enforceable. Basically, for app users in the EU, you have to allow them to choose if you can collect private data on them. While you might not personally be collecting information, the services you are using may. Prior to daily build 2018.3286, Corona has collected users’ IP addresses, the iOS ID for Vendors, and the Android equivalent. Starting with 2018.3286 and later, the data we collect does not contain any personally identifiable data. Regardless, you need to either update your apps to ask for permission to collect data (if you need to use an older version of Corona) or build with a newer version since we don’t collect data that you need to get permission for. Our friends at Appodeal have produced another great Q&A on how they are handling GDPR and things you need to do to meet the requirements. It’s worth looking over these questions and answers to help you understand what you need to do.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

The Corona 2D game engine is going open source in 2019

After more than nine years of developing and evolving the Corona game engine, Corona Labs is releasing its technology to open source. It’s a move we’ve been planning for a few years now, with the goal of making the engine development process more transparent, and to empower the community to directly impact future growth and potential. As part of a series of steps on a longer evolution journey, entrusting Corona to the community is the surest way to quickly respond to market shifts and changes, ensuring Corona stays relevant and valuable to all mobile app developers. “The transition of Corona to the open source model of development has been our long-term vision since Corona Labs was acquired by Appodeal in 2017. We believe that this move will bring transparency to the development process, and will allow users to contribute features or bug fixes to make the project better for everyone,” said Vlad Sherban, product manager for Corona Labs. The open source model will bring more visibility and flexibility to the development process by allowing visibility into exactly what the engine team is working on and where the project is going, and by contributing valuable new features that will help spearhead Corona to the next level. Additional benefits for businesses include the potential to acquire a commercial license for source code and customize the engine for specific commercial projects. “Corona Labs will continue to have a dedicated team and infrastructure to support our flourishing plugin ecosystem and infrastructure, as well as to keep up to date with the ever-changing requirements and updates coming from applications stores. Powered by the new open source model and supported by the development of new features and bug fixes will make Corona more community driven — but not without our help and guidance. Ultimately, going open source will provide confidence in the future of the engine and an opportunity to grow community involvement in engine development,” said Vlad Sherban, product manager for Corona Labs. Details Most parts of Corona’s code will be open sourced except for some plugins, the Corona Marketplace, www.coronalabs.com, and the build infrastructure. This is not a final or exhaustive list as the team may open source even more as we move forward. More about Corona open source can be found on the FAQ page. Licenses Corona will be dual-licensed under both commercial and open source licenses. The open source license is the GNU GPLv3 license, and commercial license will be available upon agreement with Corona Labs. You can download the Corona source code under the GPLv3 license and build your games and apps, however, those games have to be distributed under the GPLv3 license, i.e you have to make your source available. Games and apps based on the open source distribution of Corona have to be distributed using the same license (GPLv3). You can download the Corona source code, negotiate a commercial license agreement with Corona Labs, and build a version of Corona that has a custom feature. You can then distribute your games and apps without opening your own source. About Corona Corona is a free, cross-platform framework ideal for creating 2D games and apps for mobile devices, desktop systems, TV platforms and the web. It is driven by the easy-to-learn Lua language, over 1,000 built-in APIs and plugins, and Corona Native extensions (C/C++/Obj-C/Java). The Corona engine has been updated with HTML5 and Linux (alpha-version) building during 2018 and celebrated our 9th anniversary from the date of the first release. You can find the full source code on GitHub. Contacts:
devrel@coronlabs.com
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Corona Roadmap 2018

Our engineering team would like to take this opportunity to share with the community our development goals for the year. Product roadmaps can be unpredictable. While items may be added, removed or postponed, the following roadmap should give you a general sense of what our plans are, with the understanding that they are subject to change without notice. These are estimated start dates. In most cases, we hope to start and complete the items during their listed quarter, but some items are large projects and will span multiple quarters. Also there is no implied order for each quarter — some items toward the end of each quarter list may be finished before items near the beginning are even started. Q1 2018 Continue working on implementing HTML5 builds Better support for emitters when added to display groups Android API level 27 support New Android sound subsystem based on modern APIs Improve Appodeal plugin Auto-click masks Marketplace 2.0 Animation plugin Rebuild internal statistics system Open source Lua frameworks like timer.* and transition.* Q2 2018 Improve Live Builds by adding console logging HTML5 to public beta Support arm64 architectures Investigate Linux builds Move the Android build system to Gradle based Move the Plugin build system to Gradle based Investigate wireless install for iOS, tvOS Revenue-share version of the AdMob plugin Q3 2018 Explore Windows Universal Builds Amazon IAP improvements Per-vertex meshes coloring Optimize touch events. Tile engine support Text rendering plugin Q4 2018 Open Source efforts Explore the Nintendo Switch platform iOS Offline builds from Corona Simulator Corona is a tool for you and at Corona Labs we value your feedback. Feature requests are recorded and tracked at http://feedback.coronalabs.com and we look forward to you visiting that site and voting on features that are important to you. We will continue to evaluate features requested by Corona developers and we may alter the roadmap as we get more feedback.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

From the Forum – Issue #168

Welcome to this week’s From the Forum. In this post, we highlight a few Corona Community Forums posts that cover important topics. Modules, modules, modules Developers love to build their own libraries. The bigger they get, the more important organization of the code becomes. In this thread, learn some strategies for maintaining modules in your code. Moving containers The original poster’s question was curious how to move a display object so that it only shows part of the object, depending on the position. Think of moving a character in front of an X-Ray machine. Enter containers. This thread goes into quite a bit of depth on how to use containers to partially reveal objects. Cool Lua syntax The original poster saw some Lua syntax that wasn’t familiar. Enter forum superstar @roaminggamer with a great explanation on single line conditionals to populate variables in this thread. Do you have a particular forum thread that was helpful for you? Let us know about it! Email support@coronalabs.com, put FTF: and the forum title in the subject, and include the URL in the email. We will consider adding it to an upcoming edition of From the Forum.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Happy Holidays from Corona Labs

Corona Labs would like to take a brief moment to wish everyone worldwide a Happy Holidays. We have had a great year and have added many new features to the Corona suite of tools: Make Corona Enterprise free by merging it with Corona SDK into one product (Corona) Made Corona Native available for Windows developers Paid Facebook Audience Network (FAN) plugin and AppLovin without revenue share, to complement the free FAN and AppLovin plugins Make the Welcome Window more useful with better access to the Marketplace, documentation, and more Update our website Modernize Corona Simulator for Windows Add support for CoronaBuilder to download plugins for native users Calendar plugin Begin working on Marketplace 2.0 Resume HTML5 development Improve tvOS support (add missing features like IAP and Game Center support) We are happy that you’ve chosen Corona as your favorite development tool, which makes us a worldwide company. Our team is located in various countries as well, and as such we will be taking some much needed time off to spend with family and friends. We may not be able to respond between December 25 and January 8. We wish you the very best for the rest of 2018 and a very successful 2019!
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Working smarter when building games

In this post, we explore a three-part blog series from Sara Casen, the co-founder at Midnight Hub, a five-person development team in Sweden. While many Corona developers are solo or small two-person shops, many others are working with even larger teams, but regardless of being solo or part of a team working smarter is always a good thing. While all of this might not apply to your situation, it’s certainly worth thinking about. Lake Ridden is a story-driven first person mystery filled with puzzles, developed by former Minecraft and Paradox devs, in Sweden. Part 1 – Avoid Brain Damage From Working With Games According to Casen, the average career span of a game developer in Norwegian countries is about four years after which they are burned out. Long work-weeks, stress, unrealistic deadlines and other pressures create more problems that have to be solved. In this series she addresses how working more manageable hours lead to more productive hours. Part 2 – Making Your Game With The ABC-Recipe In this part of the series, Casen talks about the ABC method for building your game up which has the net effect of defining deliverables in a more productive way. This is a unique way to look at managing your project from development to deliverable. Part 3 – Burning Money, Brain Power and Morale To Make Your Game In the final part of this three-part series, Casen discusses resource management and how to manage more than time and money to get your team to their maximum efficiency without burning through all of your resources regardless of it being financial or human. There is a lot of good information in these three posts that will be really helpful for any studio, building games or any other software product.  
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Recent virus reports

Some of our Microsoft Windows customers who run a couple of virus/malware checking software have noticed that our installer was testing positive for a Other:Malware-gen [Trj] alert. Avast and AVG were flagging this. ESET and Fortinet reported a PUP or “potentially unwanted program” for a web-bar they detected. The other 51 virus tools reporting to virustotal.com gave Corona a clean bill of health. What was the cause of these? Corona’s installer included a file named dma.dll. This file was part of the DeskMetrics library, an analytics service we used to help collect crash reports. The dma.dll file is actually harmless, but to remove any doubt, we have removed this file from our Windows installer. This change goes live with daily build 2018.3226. If you’re concerned about the presence of this file in our installer, please update to 2018.3226 or later.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

From the Forum – Issue #163

Welcome to this week’s From the Forum. In this post, we highlight a few Corona Community Forums posts that cover important topics. Optimizing your graphics Most Corona developers are happy with the performance of our engine and never give a thought to what’s going on under the hood, but there are some who are pushing really complex ideas through the graphics pipeline. In this post, discover how to optimize your art to be as efficient as possible. Functions vs. coroutines In this post, a developer wanted to understand the difference between functions and coroutines. Our wonderful developer community responded with a great description. Group coordinates Corona display groups have their own coordinate space when compared to the overall screen. This thread covers how to convert between these with ease. Do you have a particular forum thread that was helpful for you? Let us know about it! Email support@coronalabs.com, put FTF: and the forum title in the subject, and include the URL in the email. We will consider adding it to an upcoming edition of From the Forum.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

#CoronaDefoldJam begins July 28th

Just what is #CoronaDefoldJam? GamesJam.org is hosting a game jam to promote Lua as a great language for game development and game jams. For this jam, developers can use either Corona or Defold for their projects. Details #CoronaDefoldJam starts on July 28, 2017, coinciding with the Ludum Dare 39 jam, and runs until October 1, 2017. At the end of Ludum Dare 39, you can submit your app for that jam and then continue to refine it until the end of #CoronaDefoldJam on October 1st. The project theme will be the same theme announced by Ludum Dare 39. The jam will conclude with announcements of the winners at DevGAMM in October. This is a great opportunity for Corona developers to participate in a game jam and show off the awesomeness that is Corona. To learn more, please visit the official game jam page. We look forward to seeing what you can create!
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

The 10 secrets to indie game success

We all want to make successful apps, but how do we get there? There are many different ideas of how to reach success and many different ways to get there, but it’s a challenging path. Think about Fortnite’s “Battle Royale” format. You start with 100 players and at the end only one person has climbed to the top and can claim “Victory Royale”.  Now imagine that but on a much grander scale. Your indie title is competing against thousands of other indie titles and of course the “pro” AAA titles that come out as well.  Luck will sometimes favor you to the top. Hard work will sometimes propel you and other times it’s perseverance. There are plenty of things for you to think about. Paul Taylor, the Joint Managing Director of Mode 7 Games, an indie studio based in Oxford, UK provides ten things for you to think about as you start building your next Indie title. Read over this blog post which just might be the key to your next hit. Click here to read: The 10 Secrets to Indie Game Success
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Updated Vungle plugin (v5.1) with new features

Vungle, a Corona Labs video ad partner, has released a new plugin which integrates version 5.1 of their SDK. This updated plugin also brings some new features that you may find desirable, including: Vungle now supports multiple ad placements. Instead of a single video asset type, you can now use multiple placements with either video or rewarded video types. Dynamic Templates let you give more users even more ad templates. Native Ads, or Vungle’s Flex-View technology, lets you add immersive video ad banners into your app’s user experience (you will need to contact your Vungle account manager to enable this feature). To use the new version of Vungle, edit your build.settings and replace… ["CoronaProvider.ads.vungle"] = { publisherId = "com.vungle" }, …with this: ["plugin.vungle"] = { publisherId = "com.vungle" } You will also need to use daily build 2017.3103 or later to access the new plugin. For more details, see the Vungle 5.1 documentation.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

A different approach to game difficulty

The concept of game difficulty is always a challenge for developers. Games that are too easy won’t get played. Games that are too hard will frustrate the users and they will quit. You have to find that right balance of difficulty where the player feels challenged yet feels as if they are progressing. To compound matters, no two players are the same. Some need an easier game, others need a lot more challenge. How do you strike that balance? Alex Vu, pixel artist and game designer working for Fine Monkeys, LLC has contemplated the problem, and discusses some solutions in his blog post A Different Approach to Difficulty. In this post, he talks about the problems with simple difficulty modes as well as Dynamic Difficulty Adjustment (DDA) and offers a deep dive into Organic Difficulty and Effectiveness-Ludoaesthetics Spectrum. This advice might just make your game more interesting to your players. Read: A Different Approach to Difficulty   View the full article  

CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Cool things in the Marketplace 8/31/18

If you haven’t peeked into the Corona Marketplace recently, it now offers dozens of plugins and assets, from art packs to audio tracks to useful utility plugins. Periodically, we will highlight a few exciting products which can help you develop your dream app using Corona. AppsFlyer AppsFlyer is the world’s leading mobile attribution & marketing analytics platform, helping app marketers around the world make better decisions. Check it out! 5 Fruit Monsters 2D Game Character Sprite 5 Fruit Monsters is a set of cartoon sprites that can be used in 2D games like platformers or endless runners. Hud Interface Sounds Hud Interface Sounds by Cinematic Sound Design delivers a huge collection of user interface, computations, readouts, glitches, Sci-Fi sounds and more.  
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Welcome to the new Corona Marketplace

Today, Corona Labs is pleased to announce that our new Marketplace is online and ready for use. Since opening our original Marketplace in 2016, hundreds of plugins and assets have been submitted to the store and is powering many Corona made apps. In addition to an all new look, the new marketplace supports a new submission form, giving you more control over your promotional images and information. This will help speed up submission approvals. This will also help us promote your products better through featuring and social sharing. If you haven’t looked at the Marketplace recently, please drop by https://marketplace.coronalabs.com and give the new site a look!
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

From the Forum – Issue #166

Welcome to this week’s From the Forum. In this post, we highlight a few Corona Community Forums posts that cover important topics. Dynamic level modules In this forum post, the original poster was interested in how to best manage level data for a large number of levels. Using local .lua files was loading large amounts of unneeded data. Corona’s developer community came to the rescue and offered some great suggestions on using SQLite and tools to help manage it. iOS 11 and icons Apple changed the rules on app submissions with regards to icons. However, even with the new methods listed here, several developers still ran into a few additional issues with their Apple app submissions. This thread covers fixing many of them. Google Path Traversal vulnerability Every Corona developer with apps on Google Play were notified last week that Google would start enforcing take-downs of apps that continue to have this Google Path Traversal Vulnerability issue. Daily build 2017.3145 addresses the issue. See this thread for a full discussion on how to tell when Google is happy with your update. Do you have a particular forum thread that was helpful for you? Let us know about it! Email support@coronalabs.com, put FTF: and the forum title in the subject, and include the URL in the email. We will consider adding it to an upcoming edition of From the Forum.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Ludum Dare 40 starts this weekend

Ludum Dare 40 starts this weekend, December 1st, 2017. For those not familiar, Ludum Dare is one of the most popular game jams in the universe! The theme voting is currently going on now. Corona developers have an advantage over other platforms with Corona’s instant-update, no compile-time simulator. You can prototype your game jam projects faster than with other platforms. It’s also a great opportunity for Corona developers to showcase their skills in this global competition. Let us know in the Corona Forums if you’re planning on participating!
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Corona nominated for Pocket Gamer award

Corona Lab’s 2D game engine, Corona is a finalist for the Pocket Gamer Mobile Game Awards 2018 in the Best Development Tool category. We have had a great year and are honored to have been recognized by the industry for the hard work we continue to put into Corona. The Mobile Games Awards will be presented at Pocket Gamer Connects London 2018, Tuesday, January 23rd 2018.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Featured game: Drag n Zip

Dragons, fireballs, pit-traps — Drag n Zip has all of this and more! Drag n Zip is a new Corona-built game from Cluck Eye Tea. The game is about a thief named Zip on a quest to conquer the five kingdoms. Along the way, you collect coins, gems, potions, and more while dodging those dragons, fireballs, and pit-traps. Drag n Zip was developed by William Francis and his son as their annual summer project. Francis said “I am a professional app developer by day who works on apps for mega-brands like Chick-fil-A, Coke, Fox News, and Game Show Network. My son and I are huge gamers though and our favorite environment for writing our own games is Corona. Each summer we take on a project and this summer’s project was Drag n Zip.” The game uses a different movement technique compared to the “virtual joypad” usually found in these type of games. Instead, you simply drag Zip around the environment from place to place. The mechanic works well and the game gets more challenging as you advance. Drag n Zip is available for free with advertising and in-app purchases. It’s available on the Apple App Store and Google Play.  
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Featured App: The Ukulele App

An area where #MadeWithCorona apps shine are educational apps. Frequently, when talking about educational apps, we think of apps for school-aged children, but there are other types of educational apps as well. Today, we explore The Ukulele App by Jon Howard. Since launching the app on December 16, 2016, The Ukulele App has had over 710,000 downloads. Jon developed the app to help ukulele players learn the instrument and practice their skills. He also contacted the largest ukulele tutorial channel on YouTube and branded the app to the channel. Using a combination of Corona widgets and animation features alongside web views for playing videos, Jon created a consistent look and feel across iOS, Android, and Kindle Fire versions. He also used math formulas to calculate all of the various chords and scales to make the collection complete. The Ukulele App is available for free with in-app purchases on the Apple App Store, Google Play, and Amazon.   
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

From the Forum – Issue #161

Welcome to this week’s From the Forum. In this post, we highlight a few Corona Community Forums posts that cover important topics. Look up in the sky… It’s Coronium SkyTable! We welcome awesome community contributor Develephant back to the forums and he comes back with a bang, releasing not one but two new plugins to satisfy your online cravings. It didn’t take long for the community to start dreaming up ideas to use these new tools — in this post, learn how Coronium SkyTable might be a great way to push configurations out to client apps. Manipulating tiles No doubt platformers and overhead games benefit from tilesets. There are some great tools and libraries for working with a tileset, but how do you manipulate a tileset you already have that needs some work? This thread provides ideas and offers a free tool which can help with your graphics needs. Making your game loop smaller Corona’s concept of a “game loop” is an event that triggers every frame. Having an efficient “enterFrame” function is a healthy thing. In this thread, see how one developer ended up with a more optimized game loop. Do you have a particular forum thread that was helpful for you? Let us know about it! Email support@coronalabs.com, put FTF: and the forum title in the subject, and include the URL in the email. We will consider adding it to an upcoming edition of From the Forum.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

#madewithcorona: Mission Me!

Periodically a game comes along that breaks out and does something different. Corona Labs would like to introduce you to Mission Me by Sillysoft Games. Mission Me is a lifestyle game. In this game, you get missions that you frequently have to do in real life and may require you to get off of your device for a while to accomplish. As you complete missions, you gain experience and move up to more missions. Example missions include things like “Clean up your desk and add a decoration” or “Say something nice to a cashier”. You start with “Self” missions and move to “Family” missions and so on. This game is engaging and helps you with your own self-esteem. The game is available as a free app on Apple’s App Store and Google Play. Check it out! If you want you can leave feedback to the developer in our Community Forums!  
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Corona Marketplace – Recent featured products

If you haven’t peeked into the Corona Marketplace recently, it now offers dozens of plugins and assets, from art packs to audio tracks to useful utility plugins. Periodically, we will highlight a few exciting products which can help you develop your dream app using Corona. Character Sprites Dion Artworks has recently added even more of their great Character Sprites, which are great for various platformer, side-scrolling and running type games at a very affordable price. Google Vision The Google Vision plugin from Plant Pot allows you to process images looking for face, logo and landmark detection, optical character recognition and more. Check it out! Account Kit Plugin The Account Kit plugin from Scott Harrison lets you manage logins without usernames and passwords using Facebook’s “Account Kit”. It will let you manage logins via email or a phone!!
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

From the Forum – Issue #170

Welcome to this week’s From the Forum. In this post, we highlight a few Corona Community Forums posts that cover important topics. All I want for Christmas… Or Winter holiday of your choosing… In this thread, several users come up with various wish lists they have for the holidays. Maybe you can help make someone’s wish come true even if it’s just voting for a feature at http://feedback.coronalabs.com. Dynamic database tables The original poster needed to name and create SQL table names on the fly. Community developer hero @develephant comes to the rescue with an easy-to-use line of code to create the SQL to make these dynamically named tables. Letters to numbers The original poster needed to convert letters to numbers. Several Corona community developers jumped in with different techniques to make this happen. Do you have a particular forum thread that was helpful for you? Let us know about it! Email support@coronalabs.com, put FTF: and the forum title in the subject, and include the URL in the email. We will consider adding it to an upcoming edition of From the Forum.
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

 

Corona Labs releases a new public build

Corona Labs is pleased to announce the availability of our latest public release of Corona: 2018.3326. This build contains significant bug fixes and new features that we hope you will appreciate. Google Play One of the biggest changes in this public build is addressing changes required by Google. Since the last public build, Google has changed their Vitals detection methods and have gotten considerably more aggressive with their detection. To support these changes, we’ve updated all of our support plugins for Android to bring them up to modern standards. We have also increased our Android API level to 27 (Android 8.1) in preparation for Google’s August, 2018 requirement to have API level 26 support. Google is also pushing new app signing procedures. As such, Corona can now employ the modern encryption methods used by the latest Java keytool built keystores as well as older keystores. HTML5 You will notice that a majority of the updates in this build are involving HTML5. That’s right – HTML5 builds are now in Open Beta! HTML5 is becoming a considerably more stable product. We now include the base code needed to build Facebook Instant Games as well as support for the VK social media site’s version as well. HTML5 builds are already having an impact on other platforms. Developers have prototyped HTML5 versions of game ideas and pitched them to publishers to build mobile versions of the games. Being able to quickly give someone a look into your prototype is a great way to market your content. GDPR The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation went into effect on May 25, 2018. This public release of Corona does not collect data considered personal in nature. Also, Corona Labs doesn’t collect any personal data in Corona-managed advertising plugins. The third-party SDKs used in the plugins have their own GDPR requirements.. Apple On the Apple side, we have updated to support iOS 11.4 and Xcode 9.4 and implemented additional features to support iOS 11 edge gestures that impact the iPhone X. One breaking change that comes with iOS 11 is that getting the default language of the device is now dependent on additions to the iOS plist. iOS 11 only returns supported values that your app supports. You must include an entry in your build.settings file to list the supported languages by the app. For example: settings = { iphone = { plist = { CFBundleLocalizations = {"en", "fr", "pt", "zh", "de", "it", "ja", "es", "ru", "uk"}, }, }, } You can look at the sample app: SampleCode/GettingStarted/HelloWorldLocalized for an example of this requirement or see our localization guide. Open-source libraries In addition to these changes, Corona Labs is open-sourcing the following libraries: timer.* easing.* transition.* composer.* You can download the Lua source for these libraries from the Corona Labs GitHub account. In addition, the widget.* library was updated to be in sync with our internal library. Facebook Facebook has recently changed their permission requirements for apps. You now have to submit your app to Facebook for review and get approved to use the user_friends permission. We have removed the default addition of the user_friends permission from the login process. Starting with this release (2018.3326) plugin facebook_v4a only asks for public_profile by default. This may be a breaking change if your app depends on the user_friends permission. If this is a case, add the permission when requesting login, like facebook.login( { 'user_friends' } ). Check it out! You can see a full list of changes in our release notes for 2017.3326. If you have questions or comments on this release, join us in our community forums. Download Corona
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CoronaRob

CoronaRob

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