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Trapper Zoid

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Another quick question for those who peruse the journals:

If I'm going to be making a game more advanced than a dinky arcade game, it's probably a good idea to consider using some in-house development tools to help with the game construction. While I've played around with some generic 2D tile tools, it's likely I'll need to write my own. However, I'm rusty as I can be at windowed GUI development: when I was an undergrad I did do some work with Tcl/Tk and Java, but I've forgotten most of the details about them now.

What I'd like is the ability to quickly and easily throw together a GUI to build things (exactly what things I'll have to decide on) which can also run relevant C++ code from the game. The in-house tools themselves don't need to be particularly pretty or speedy.

Given I know a lot of you use your own tools, is there any recommendations for what packages I should look at, and a rough guide on how long it will take to get to speed with them? I need to factor that in to my time plan for the 4E5 project.


Additional: I notice that Inkscape version 0.44 is out! They've managed to fix some of the rather annoying little quirks that have been bugging me in 0.43 as well. Defintely going to be downloading this the moment I get back to Australia!
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I thought a time plan was against the spirit of the contest? ;)

I've only really used a couple of widget toolkits - GTK and wxWidgets. They're both good, and they both have GUI designers (ie you don't have to code in the positions of every widget), and they both have different styles of doing things. However, if you're wanting really really rapid building of GUIs, they might not be so good. wxWidgets particularly needs more work to integrate into code than GTK IMHO, but last time I tried it GTK had a fairly awful windows implementation still. I'm pretty sure both have bindings to several languages, but they might not be what you're wanting.

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Quote:
Original post by baldurk
I thought a time plan was against the spirit of the contest? ;)

Hey, you started it! Now I've caught the need to work on a properly managed project [grin].

I've been meaning to look into wxWidgets myself for a while, and I think I gathered up some resources for it a few months ago which have been gathering dust. I guess by default I'll go with that, since I've already got the files and tutorials.

There's always Python too; I've been meaning to properly learn that for a while, and it's up there on my list of scripting languages to use. I'm sure it's got a GUI toolkit too, but I'm not sure how well that will integrate with C++ code (given I know very little about Python).

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Have you considered C#?

C# makes for some very speedy GUI development (beautiful drag+drop interface on the free Visual C# Express IDE), and can fairly painlessly interface with native C++ DLLs with not bad of a performance hit.

Naturally, if you don't mean accessing code via DLLs, then C# can't help you, likely. But it's always worth tossing onto the pile of suggestions. [smile]

(EDIT: Gah. Awesome artwork on this journal! :-O I'm going to have to try to recruit you for one of my next projects!)

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Original post by HopeDagger
Have you considered C#?

I hadn't really considered C#, because I don't know a lot about it. If it really is that easy to make GUIs then I should probably look into it. The big minus for me is that I've heard it's fairly Windows-only (I think there's some equivalents on other platforms but I'm not that sure). While I tend to do game dev under Windows anyway (for now), my academic research is done in various flavours of Linux and Unix, and it would be nice to apply my GUI knowledge there as well. I'm also strongly considering getting a MacBook soon, and would like to be able to code on that too.

Quote:
Naturally, if you don't mean accessing code via DLLs, then C# can't help you, likely. But it's always worth tossing onto the pile of suggestions. [smile]

DLLs are fine. It's really just that I were to develop an AI testing tool, for example, I'd like to use the exact same code for both the tool and the game.

Quote:
(EDIT: Gah. Awesome artwork on this journal! :-O I'm going to have to try to recruit you for one of my next projects!)

Thanks! While I'm filling up my spare time with my own projects, you're always welcome to try and recruit me for a project[grin].

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My original games were done with what is now known as the OpenOffice Framework. It works and has certainly stood the test of time.

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I have to second C#. I learned a good chunk of it in around 2 days. Importing C++ code into it is really easy as well. If you decide to go with C#, you can IM me on AIM/email/PM with any questions you have and I can try to help (I check my email and PMs about once an hour and my AIM is pretty much always on.)

Your art continues to rock! Keep up the good work.

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