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Pictures and stuff

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jollyjeffers

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We all know that good journals have pictures in. Ideally these pictures would be of something currently in development (or, at least, development oriented). You guys will have to settle for a few of my holiday photos. I figured they were both quite pretty and I can also tie some of them to my previous ramblings about water rendering.

For those of you who want more developer-related stuff, I've added my review of Jim Blinn's book. I started a thread in GP&T about their relevance a while back and, in retrospect, I think ApochPiQ was 100% correct in saying "no amount of theory is irrelevant" (here). It's also interesting to note that the very same book is still recommended in the DirectX SDK's Graphics Information further reading list. Although now that Wolfgang Engel is an MVP I wonder if more of his titles will appear in that list [lol]...

Anyway, the photos:

On Tuesday I got to visit St Abb's head (not sure of the spelling for that though [oh]):



I'm a big fan of coastal geography and will quite happily sit and just appreciate the views. It's been a prior source of frustration that I've never managed to implement decent cliff/coastal rendering into my terrain engines.



Same location, but a nice little rock-pool showing off water reflection (see, relevant to my graphics commentry). Strikes me that most of the reflection is the sky and the darker areas on the water (that might seem to be reflections of the rocks) are in fact shadows.



A bit further along the same coastline, looking straight down gives some refraction (notably only where its very shallow) but mostly just the darkness of the water.



The following day I got a chance to sit down next to this beautiful river and have my lunch.



Later that day I managed to demonstrate that bloom does indeed exist in the "real world". I can also confirm that those crazy northerners are quite handy when it comes to making bridges. Apparently the bridge in the foreground was the first example of a pre-fabricated concrete bridge.



Went on a boat trip around the Farne Islands. Was exceptionally nice weather (ocean was completely flat as well) and got to see a huge number of bird-s**t covered rocks. Yes, that white colouring is indeed bird s**t [oh].



I think this seal had had a very heavy night - looks very hungover to me.



This seal was much more friendly and came over to our boat to say hello.



Even got a decent snap of a Puffin [grin]. Apparently there are sometimes around 50-60 thousand of these birds flying around, but we only saw a few 100 - and they fly so damned fast its impossible to get a picture.



On the last day we wandered around to see another example of northerners and their bridges. I think this was one of the very first chain suspension bridges. Bounces up and down a lot when a car drives across.



Saving the best till last... Curiously this sign only appears on the Scottish side of the bridge which might be suggesting something [lol]

That is all for now. I'll probably be using my many (higher resolution) snaps of water to guide my efforts when messing with my water renderer in the following week(s).
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Nice. I like the bloom/HDR rendering on the 6th picture.


(Just kidding. I'm so used to looking at your pictures BEFORE reading the text that I thought I was looking at some really kickarse D3D screenshots. [lol])

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I thought I was looking at some really kickarse D3D screenshots
I wish [smile]

I am tempted to try and mock-up that rock pool as some test-data for my work with water rendering.

Quote:
Did you jump off the bridge?
Yes. I love blackcurrants and redcurrants (and other similar fruit) so I just had to find out what a "strong current" was.

Jack

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Yes. I love blackcurrants and redcurrants (and other similar fruit) so I just had to find out what a "strong current" was.
[headshake]

Thanks for sharing the photos. It was a nice read. I look forward to your water renderings.

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