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Trapper Zoid

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Thanks to Balaam's suggestion I've installed TortoiseSVN and moved Ice Slider into version control. Subversion does seem to be a fair bit less painful than CVS, given it didn't take that long to both set up the repository or to fix up the inevitable mistakes (such as checking in files that have no business to be under revision control).

I've also put across the (nearly) empty Project Crystal directory to see if it's painless to run more than one project in the same repository, and it seems to work. The starting revision number is already up to about 30 so I'm assuming it's based on the entire repository rather than the project.

I suspect it'll take me a while to figure out how to properly use the differences between the "trunk", "branches" and "tags" in the directory structure that the documentation suggested - I'm not sure what's standard practice for when to use a branch or what to name the tags - and I'm still unsure of the best way to backup the repository, but at least now I don't have to be so paranoid about breaking something with a sweeping architecture change.
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I don't bother with trunk/branches/tags; my SVN repo is just a flat directory I drop projects into.

To back up I do svnadmin dump. This blog entry has some more info.

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Use trunk for the latest development stuff.

When you want to make a release of what's in the trunk, copy all of it into a new folder in your tags directory. Name it something like MyProject_0_4 for release of 0.4 of MyProject.

If at some point you decide to make a huge design change, branch it off of trunk. Make a new directory in your branches and copy the contents of trunk into there and start working on it.

...... And that pretty much sums it up.

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Quote:
Original post by Rob Loach
Use trunk for the latest development stuff.

When you want to make a release of what's in the trunk, copy all of it into a new folder in your tags directory. Name it something like MyProject_0_4 for release of 0.4 of MyProject.

If at some point you decide to make a huge design change, branch it off of trunk. Make a new directory in your branches and copy the contents of trunk into there and start working on it.

...... And that pretty much sums it up.

The bit I'm unsure of is why I would need to use a branch - surely I could just wind back the trunk to the point when I started making the changes.

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Original post by Ravuya
I don't bother with trunk/branches/tags; my SVN repo is just a flat directory I drop projects into.

I was debating whether I needed to bother with that, but I decided I might eventually like to use tags so I might as well do it the recommended way. I can always just use the trunk if I decide against it.

Quote:
To back up I do svnadmin dump. This blog entry has some more info.

Thanks - I'll set up some sort of system that can copy a zipped version of the repository to my "backup" directory and everything should be fine.

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We use branches when we need to make a major change.

For example, Person A wants to change his part of the engine but he knows it's going to be breaking the code base for 2-3 weeks. He branches it and gets off to work. Persons B & C can continue writing code and keep working on their part of the code base.

Later, the fork can be healed and the problems resolved.

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