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Exams! Exams!

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HopeDagger

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Exams!

I'm still here, just very busy with final exams. Four of five are completed, and they are went pretty well -- it's looking to be a good term, markwise. I have one more this Saturday, and then I'm heading back home on the Monday. It'll be nice to be back after being stuck in this tiny dorm room for so long. [smile]


Stencyl

This has been the other major timesink of my recent schedule. I'm very keen to finish up the collision detection system ASAP so I can move onto my next project, so my activity elsewhere in gamedev has been virtually non-existent. Still, having the opportunity to work on software with this much gleaming potential is a rare opportunity. I wish Jon the best of luck as the project begins to fall more and more into the public eye.

Stencyl will be opening its doors (the forum doors, at least) tomorrow at 6PM EST to the public, so I encourage you to drop in and see what Stencyl is all about. Many of you probably won't have any immediate interest, since you already know how to write games [smile], but it's still worth a look-see.


Borland: Turbo Explorer Editions

These have apparently been out for nearly a year now, but it's news to me -- good news at that! Borland has been making killer IDEs for years now, although they've generally been pretty high-priced. In the spirit of the original Turbo Pascal days they've released 'Explorer Editions' of Delphi, C++ Builder, C# Builder, and Delphi for .NET. They are all (nearly) fully functioning products, and are a huge boon for quick application development or prototyping. The only downside is that you can only download one per computer. Still, for people wanting to try out Delphi or C++Builder, which has been proprietarily sealed for the last several years (to hobbyists/students), it's a great opportunity.

Take a gander: http://www.turbomirror.com

My only beef is that they did a god-awful job with the website. It looks like something from "The Internet of Ten Years Ago". [sad]


More Game Development!?

Looks like I'll be writing games "professionally" this summer.

Here's the backstory: my friend Kasra, also the president of the uni's GameDev Club, filled me in on a project that some company in Waterloo contacted him about through our club site. They're a small-ish company focusing on writing services for cellphones and PCs (chatting, lobbies, IMing, etc), but also have a slowly-growing game development 'studio' being run by one of their employees. They already have a dozen small games made in C++ using one of their aforementioned services, but it's using an obsolete service/library and they need to all be changed over to the new library. So we'd be working part-time changing them over.

So in a nutshell, our task is to convert the dozen games from using one library to another. Heh. So me and Kasra decided we'd basically write a little abstraction layer between the two libraries, and just use the old function names and give them the new libraries' functionality.

In short: super-easy. [smile] We still haven't worked out compensation details, but anything is fine. This'll be a great chance to get some 'game development' on my resume, and I get to work from home. It's adds an extra 2-3 hours or so a day to my full-time job workload, but I think it's definitely worth it. It also will likely mean an XBox 360 by the end of the term. [grin]
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Huh,

I must be living in a cave or something... how long has this Stencyl program been underway? I've seen you mention it before, but I just assumed it was a bunch of code to reduce redundancy -- I didn't realize it was a full blown GUI driven game maker!

Wow!
Not only am I impressed, but I am kind of jealous, because I have wanted to do a very similar thing for some time now. Cheers for beating me to it!

So, to clarify, does Stencyl create executables? Or does it create some kind of script file that is run through a generic client of some sort? Its free right, but what about a game a person makes (assuming they make the graphics too)? Are you free to distribte, and at cost?

Just some questions as to how you have approached the entire thing =) Anyways, well done. You have really piqued my interest. That's like the second time in a week. Geez.

=)

EDIT (apologies for the long post):
Ok, so I went backthrough your site again (which is quite nice btw) and am a bit more confused than before.

So you have these kits, which seem fairly fleshed out, but what is exactly involved in making new games? How do you actually 'make' the game? Do you have a custom scripting system or are you supposed to edit the source? Just wondering, because the kits seemed (to me, and I am probably off) that all you really do is build levels for one of the various game types. As in: put this here, put that there (which is still cool, don't get me wrong =).

Editing the source is fine and dandy for many programmer type people, but I think an in-GUI scripting system that was simple enough for beginner/non-programmers would really push the audience with this thing. Design wise it seems terrific.

Yeah, sorry, probably should have just saved these questions for your upcoming forum =)

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Quote:
Original post by shadowcomplex
I must be living in a cave or something... how long has this Stencyl program been underway? I've seen you mention it before, but I just assumed it was a bunch of code to reduce redundancy -- I didn't realize it was a full blown GUI driven game maker!


It's been in development since January of 2006, approximately.

Quote:
Not only am I impressed, but I am kind of jealous, because I have wanted to do a very similar thing for some time now. Cheers for beating me to it!


It's not my project -- I hope I didn't give that impression. The creator and lead developer is Jon. I'm just rewriting the collision detection system for it.

Quote:
So, to clarify, does Stencyl create executables? Or does it create some kind of script file that is run through a generic client of some sort? Its free right, but what about a game a person makes (assuming they make the graphics too)? Are you free to distribte, and at cost?


The game creates a JAR which can be run directly, but since executable-producing software is available for Java, this is totally doable as well. And yes, to my knowledge, people can do pretty much whatever they want with what they make.

Quote:
Just some questions as to how you have approached the entire thing =)


Pop by the forum (it's up now) and do some reading, and ask some questions, for sure. If I can't answer them, Jon certainly can.

Quote:
Ok, so I went backthrough your site again (which is quite nice btw) and am a bit more confused than before.


Just to clarify again (mainly to anyone else who is reading): Stencyl is not my project. I'm just programming some subsystems for it.

Quote:
So you have these kits, which seem fairly fleshed out, but what is exactly involved in making new games? How do you actually 'make' the game? Do you have a custom scripting system or are you supposed to edit the source? Just wondering, because the kits seemed (to me, and I am probably off) that all you really do is build levels for one of the various game types. As in: put this here, put that there (which is still cool, don't get me wrong =).


A Kit is a 'template' for games to be made off of. So from the Mario Kit if someone wanted to make their own Mario game, they can write scripts and triggers for it, add new Entities, etc. to make it their own game. Think of a Kit as a reusable foundation for games of similar theme/genre to be made from with minimal hassle. Furthermore, a 'game' can be anything from a total overhaul of the Kit from a few new levels or enemies.

Quote:
Editing the source is fine and dandy for many programmer type people, but I think an in-GUI scripting system that was simple enough for beginner/non-programmers would really push the audience with this thing.


Yes, this is being made currently: the Trigger Editor. Its design is heavily influenced by the Warcraft III editor.

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Thanks for the information =)

Heh, the first time around I did think it was solely your project, but when I went through the site I realized it was a team effort. Regardless, it still looks smashing good. Congrats =)

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Congrats on your venture into the big ole world of pro game deving :)

You have some awesome work here, I'm going to have to try some of these games of yours.

Good Luck!

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