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Programmer16

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So, I've come to realize that I'm a pretty crappy programmer as it stands. I could barely answer why the prefix operator is generally better than the postfix operator. I couldn't explain why you would want to use one number type over another in certain situations (I changed this because I had misworded it. I know the difference between long, short, int, float, double, unsigned long, unsigned short, etc.) I can't tell you how memory works (stack and heap.) I don't even know what the difference between the high and low bits is (the list goes on, but three is enough lol.)

Same goes for graphics theory. I know how to get things done, but I don't really know what I'm doing. Most of the time I just jump around, changing things until they work. One of my biggest problems is that every new iteration of my engine is just a rehash and slight modification of my old engines; so I'm not really getting anywhere.

I could keep following my current path and eventually get some games finished, but they will, in no way, be efficient and they'll take a lot longer. Or, I can stop now, take some time to learn the stuff that I need to know, and then try again. Obviously, I'm going with the latter (otherwise I wouldn't be posting this [razz].) At least this time around I have the advantage of knowing how pointers work lol.

I'm going to make lots of use of this here journal; I'll be updating pretty much every day, posting what I've learned and/or asking opinions/questions.

Anyway, I'm out until tomorrow.
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What you should probably do is pick up a simple computer architecture textbook; at the very least one that explains load/store machines and register-based machines.

The one that I used was a book on SPARC assembly, which had quite a few chapters explaining how the HP15 (stack-based) calculator worked and how to write an emulator for it.

As for the short/long/int/unsigned stuff, that's pretty important. I'd go back and read up on it.

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Original post by Ravuya
What you should probably do is pick up a simple computer architecture textbook; at the very least one that explains load/store machines and register-based machines.

The one that I used was a book on SPARC assembly, which had quite a few chapters explaining how the HP15 (stack-based) calculator worked and how to write an emulator for it.


Thanks, I'll look into it.

Quote:
Original post by Ravuya
As for the short/long/int/unsigned stuff, that's pretty important. I'd go back and read up on it.


Yup, that's what I'm doing.

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You only have to look at the top of your journal to see that you are on the right track. Most people never complete projects or demos and you already have 2. You are right to focus on learning, but the practical application of what you have learnt is what makes it stick. We all appreciate simple demos as well (and screenshots).

A healthy mix of learning and practical application is the best way forward in my opinion. How optimised your code is and how efficiently is does individual tasks comes with experience, again, demos help as you can go back and improve them as you learn more - stick some debug output such as an fps counter and memory usage output in what you create then when you go back to improve them you'll see instant results.

Good luck with the learning :-)

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Don't you love coming to that sort of realization? It sucks. But even further, if you don't use it, you lose it. So be sure to utilize whatever you learn in your projects on a consistent basis. Don't feel bad, because programming is an EXTREMELY large subject and I would say it would be impossible to know it all at one given time. Stay motivated.

I agree with UKDM... I would rather think that having programs under my belt, proving that I can solve that sort of problem, that would be a better asset for me. It all comes with experience, and the passion to learn is having somebody to challenge you with a project. Which you'd get from working at a software dev house, i'm sure.

Good luck!

Also, I thought I'd let you know I poped a new blog up at www.david-mcgraw.com to replace my old site. My GDNET subscription expired, but for reasons out of my control, I still have access to it. I hope to have some development stuff going on soon! Take care!

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God, Donny, even I know how the stack and heap work. You knowing me, you'd better get some higher standard of programming knowledge soon.

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Original post by ukdm
You only have to look at the top of your journal to see that you are on the right track. Most people never complete projects or demos and you already have 2. You are right to focus on learning, but the practical application of what you have learnt is what makes it stick. We all appreciate simple demos as well (and screenshots).

A healthy mix of learning and practical application is the best way forward in my opinion. How optimised your code is and how efficiently is does individual tasks comes with experience, again, demos help as you can go back and improve them as you learn more - stick some debug output such as an fps counter and memory usage output in what you create then when you go back to improve them you'll see instant results.

Good luck with the learning :-)


Thanks, I appreciate it! And that's a really good idea, I'll have to do that.

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Original post by ildave1
Don't you love coming to that sort of realization? It sucks. But even further, if you don't use it, you lose it. So be sure to utilize whatever you learn in your projects on a consistent basis. Don't feel bad, because programming is an EXTREMELY large subject and I would say it would be impossible to know it all at one given time. Stay motivated.

I agree with UKDM... I would rather think that having programs under my belt, proving that I can solve that sort of problem, that would be a better asset for me. It all comes with experience, and the passion to learn is having somebody to challenge you with a project. Which you'd get from working at a software dev house, i'm sure.

Good luck!

Also, I thought I'd let you know I poped a new blog up at www.david-mcgraw.com to replace my old site. My GDNET subscription expired, but for reasons out of my control, I still have access to it. I hope to have some development stuff going on soon! Take care!


That's a good point, but the problem is I can't find any sort of software dev house in MI and I don't have the money to leave the state ATM.

Thanks Dave, I really appreciate it! And I'll definitely keep an eye on your new blog.

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