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Open Source licenses.

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Here's something that I've been having trouble with, picking the right open source license. GPL sucks, it's very restrictive though that's what I currently have my works under.

Basically, I want something similar to this CC license -> http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
I would use CC but it's not targeted to open source works.

Here's what I'd like in the license:
It should have attribution, obviously. People should be able to freely modify the code and combine it with other works as long as the license stays in tact.
If someone is using my code to create a product that they intend to sell then the license should require them to ask my permission before they can use my code in their product. Is it as simple as adding copyright info and contact information?

I don't want to have a situation where I put hard work in to my code, someone uses it and happens to makes some simple puzzle game that becomes hugely popular and he/she is banking some huge bucks on it when the majority of the work was technically done by me.

I looked at the QPL license but it doesn't mention anything about profit, selling, etc except in the no warranty clause http://www.qgar.org/doc/license-qpl.html


Any ideas?
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The short answer is that if you really, really want to ensure the code is used exactly how you want you'll need a lawyer to help you draft a license. This is probably overkill in your case but if it was a serious bit of code or you were using it as part of a business plan for selling commercial products I'd recommend getting a professional to help you.

However as a non-legal expert (i.e. don't take it for granted that this is correct!) it sounds like you want different clauses for commercial and non-commercial use, so just add that to your license. Put in something like "You are free to use this code for non-commercial use in the following fashion:" etc., and then add "For commercial use outside this license, contact me at...". You'll probably want some definition of what you define non-commercial use to be to make things clear.

Remember that you're free to put whatever you like in your license agreements. Make sure it covers what you want, is easy to understand and doesn't leave any ambiguity and you'll probably be fine. Of course if you've got doubts and this is important enough to get expert opinion, then you'll need a lawyer.

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