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Fun with bitmaps

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ManTis

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I'm still probing devkitPro for all the features I need, and from time to time when I see API getting complicated I have to close my eyes and think about my safe place. Where is my C# cushion when I need it? Oh well, kudos to all low-level/engine programmers out there, how you understand anything from this is beyond my ken.

I did however do some work. And estimation. Since DS 2D engine supports only up to 128 sprites, I decided to use the 3D one. devkitPro toolchain (libnds itself?) uses something that pretty faithfully follows OpenGL, and for the first time in my life I was glad to see all those glClearColor() functions, as they were something that I understood. After some troubles with understanding how texture system for DS works, I managed to texture and display rotating quad:



I know it doesn't look very impressive, but took me about 4 hours to get working :/. I would probably do it faster if it weren't for X-0ut's 3D Tron/multiplayer Snake game that got whole #gamedev, including me, into frantic, twitch-based, revenge-ridden world of ugly blocks that are trying to kill you. And it was good.

In other news, I have written down all stuff I need to do for preproduction phase of my game (at least I hope that's all. if anything new will pop up, I'll add it to the list):

[Art] Animations
- Placeholder opening video
- Placeholder animated figures
[Art] GUI
- Menu elements
[Art] Music
- Placeholder menu and level games music
[Art] SFX
- Placeholder effects
- Menu sounds
[Art] Sprites
- Placeholder game sprites
- Text and numbers
- Particle sprites
[Design] Documentation
- First stage documentation
[Design] GUI
- GUI style and layout design
[Design] Game elements
- Elements documentation
[Design] Game modes
- Preproduction modes design
[Design] Level types
- First playable level types
[Engine] Animations
- Animated sprites
- Playing videos
[Engine] Audio
- Sound system
- SFX
- Music
[Engine] Controls
- Control wrapper
[Engine] File access
- File saving and reading
[Engine] Framework
- Basic framework
[Engine] Networking
- Basic networking layer
- Download play
[Engine] Particles
- Basic particle system
- Shockwave effect
- Score particles
[Engine] Sprites
- 2D sprites
[Engine] UI
- Menu system
- HUD
[Gameplay]
- First playable

I will organize it in some way and put it on the blog so the progress on game will be easier to follow.

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It's nice to see some DS stuff on GameDev :D

I'm cloning an old Atari RTS game I liked to the DS and decided on the same method you have of using textured quads. It worked really well for me so far.

Do you know what your plans are for drawing the top screen? Mine is a rather complicated map so I opted to go the route of using 3D on both screens which isn't actually hard to get going but has drawbacks. Only 256k is available for textures and rendering is cut to 30fps.

If you need a GUI based texture converter I would recommend 'Nomad Texture Converter', I find it easier than the cmd line tools.

Goodluck with your project!

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On my top screen I want to have army/warrior/ship fighting a monster. I can easilly get away with 3D main screen for special effects, 2D screen for animated sprites.

The two-screen 3D made me curious though. How does it translate to vertices? AFAIK you are limited to 6144 vertices in 3D mode. Does it mean on both screens or per-screen?
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The two-screen 3D works by alternately drawing one of the screens per frame and using the display capture to stop flickering. Since its a brand new frame every time you render I think you still have the same limit as usual.
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