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To do DOF or not to do DOF?

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To do DOF or not to do DOF? I've decided for the last, at least for now. If I've got the physics working, I can imagine a Depth of Field effect which always focuses on the surface the crosshairs point to. Maybe you remember the precipice level in the first Half Life game, where the outlook was a blurred bitmap. I didn't like that. In my opinion it's very unnatural that you can't focus your view on what you want if your avatar is a human being. If you see the world through the cameras of a remotely controlled robot, it's a different thing.

Here is an image of my work desk, if you're interested

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Rereading: Inside Lightwave v9 by Dan Ablan
Watching: A Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
Listening: The Velvet Underground and Nico
Surfing: Digital Tools
Playing: The demos of The Mirrors Edge, Metal Gear Solid 4, Brothers in Arms: Hell's Highway and Alone in the Dark (PS3)
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Nice! You have a very clean, well-lit workspace. I can't speak for others, but I find that having a clean desk and nicely sorted apparatuses gives me way more motivation to write code than the opposite.

Sehe ich auch ein paar deutsche Bücher?

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Quote:
Original post by urs
... I can imagine a Depth of Field effect which always focuses on the surface the crosshairs point to. Maybe you remember the precipice level in the first Half Life game, where the outlook was a blurred bitmap. I didn't like that. In my opinion it's very unnatural that you can't focus your view on what you want if your avatar is a human being.


IMHO DOF effects don't make things any better. They force you to look at one place on the screen, and reduce your "peripheral vision" considerably. Strikes me that I should be able to look wherever I want on the screen without being restricted by DOF.

On the other hand, for some things (e.g. the turret view for the Mako in Mass Effect), they can be extremely helpful for resolving any ambiguity in where you're currently aiming.

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@ Hopedagger: My desktop doesn't look that tidy 99% of the time...

Ja, es stehen einige deutsche Buecher im Regal.

@ sprite_hound: In my opinion games tend too much to be like movies. I just found an example in the Mirror's Edge demo. If the girl you have to follow stands behind a fence, the camera focuses on the girl and the fence in the foreground gets blurred. Of course you can't focus on the fence. Yes, it looks nice but it also reduces the immersion. If I can't look at what I want, it destroys my fantasy of being really on these rooftops.
If the player of my future game is for example controlling by remote a satellite in the orbit of a planet from his real computer, I can imagine using "camera effects" like in Battlestar Galactica (camera is shaky and out of focus). It would augment the immersion: "Thus in recent times, the shaky camera is quintessentially seen to depict 'reality'. The technique was subsequently picked up by reality TV shows where, once again, the camera shake becomes the hallmark of realism." Source: Wanderlust Blog

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