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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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HD Rendering Is The New Black

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OrangyTang

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I decided that the searching aspects of the gameplay are largely ruined by showing a larger area of the map at larger resolutions, so I've ruled that out as a possible way of dealing with multiple resolutions. Instead I've decided to pinch a trick from console games - the game world will internally always be rendered to a "720p" texture, and then that'll be streched over the full screen to upscale or downscale to the native resolution as appropriate.

I say "720p" because (similar to how tvs do things) there isn't a single fixed resolution, instead it'll always be 720 lines vertically, and the number of horizontal pixels will vary depending on the aspect ratio. So someone with a 16:9 screen will have a virtual resolution of 1280x720, whereas those on 4:3 displays will have 960x720. In windowed mode the virtual resolution always matches the physical window size, so you still get nice 1:1 graphics when viewed like this. For fullscreen the streching may mean you'll get some loss of sharpness but doing it manually in-game gives much better quality than letting the user's TFT do the scaling.



The menus are also drawn over the top with a 720p virtual resolution, but without the render-to-texture step (they're just scaled using the projection matrices). The HUD is the exception to the rule in that it's always rendered over the top at the native resolution instead of the virtual resolution. This is possible since the components are all relatively positioned according to the screen edges.

Different aspect ratios are also handled tv-style in that anything less that 16:9 has bits of the edges chopped off. That's not a problem as it'll just make those with 4:3 displays a little more blinkered. And to avoid having to have scalable menus or multiple menu layouts I just need to keep the important stuff inside the center 4:3 area, which is easy enough now I've got red guidelines to mark off the areas for different aspect ratios.

I think it all works out quite nicely - the code stays (largely) simple because it's all dealing with a single virtual resolution, the whole game looks better because it's natively at somethingx720 instead of 800x600, windowed mode still looks nice and crisp with 1:1 sprites and everyone gets the game in the correct aspect ratio - even in fullscreen.

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I think that's a very elegant solution. I've been thinking about the same issue with resolution, viewing area, and level design in my project. Thanks for the tip! You'll be in the acknowledgements if I can get your method to work for me :)
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You're welcome! Dealing with different resolutions and aspect ratios is one of the few areas where 3d games have it much easier. I've yet to find a method for 2d that gives perfect results everywhere, but this approach seems to be the best solution so far.
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