• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

J of K

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
  • entries
    14
  • comments
    47
  • views
    20560

Why do we have a Help Wanted template?

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jbadams

411 views

As most of you probably already know, we have a required template for posts in the Help Wanted forum... but why do we have it?

The first reason is fairly obvious. Most people looking for a project to join have the same few generic questions regarding things such as payment, choice of technology and the goals of the project. The various sections of the template provide the majority of that information, saving people the need to ask and allowing people to quickly glance over the sections that most interest them.

The second reason can be somewhat less obvious however. Having to fill out the template forces people to think about those details of their project, and (although this doesn't seem terribly effective) it is hoped that in at least some cases will encourage people to do a little more preparation before forming a team. The majority of sections are things that any well thought out project should be able to answer without any problems, and apart from those headings marked as optional it should probably raise warning-flags if you're having trouble coming up with answers to any of them.

Thirdly, a poorly filled out template can often be a quick indicator to experienced users browsing the threads that a project probably doesn't have good chances.

Look at for an entry in the next few days on potential alterations to the current template.

0
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0


2 Comments


If a recruiter can't even be bothered to use a template, what makes them think they can create a game?

If we look at the hobbiest/new indie population looking for help, you're going to find the vast majority of people have no idea what they're actually going to be doing, or even what they're looking for.

How many times have we seen the stereotypical 'idea guy' looking for 'programmers', it's all too common and I think community leaders and other experienced folk should step forward and say something to the effect of:

"I can see you're new to this, typically, 'this' is how things are done."

It is of course 'easier' and at some levels more enjoyable to mock the person; however this normally comes from the typically defensive response from the unskilled and unaware.

What should be applauded (and I see it now more on the HW forum) is the poster who is willing to listen and potentially accept that they are going the wrong way about something, for the benefit of their potential project; that is what will get a game done, after you stir in a whole bunch of staying power.

The template is a great tool for weeding these folks out and has made HW a far more respectable place; there is no harm in cutting the volume of posts if the volume cut is worthless.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
Quote:
Original post by EDI
What should be applauded (and I see it now more on the HW forum) is the poster who is willing to listen and potentially accept that they are going the wrong way about something, for the benefit of their potential project; that is what will get a game done, after you stir in a whole bunch of staying power.
I couldn't agree more, and it's something I try to encourage. I'd also like to see more of the comments from other users go to encouraging and giving advice to these potentially succesful projects rather than generating more noise either picking on or wasting time repeating the same old bits of wisdom to those that aren't willing to listen; those with lower quality posts who aren't listening to advice and don't look likely to succeed should naturally sink off the thread listing rather than being constantly bumped back up by the posts of other users.

Quote:
The template is a great tool for weeding these folks out and has made HW a far more respectable place; there is no harm in cutting the volume of posts if the volume cut is worthless.
Agreed again. I'm a firm believer that the forum should be available for the use of anyone, experienced or not, but I don't feel it's any loss for effectively useless projects to be excluded.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now