Jump to content
  • Advertisement
  • entries
    154
  • comments
    388
  • views
    165367

Release!

Sign in to follow this  
O-san

437 views

Time to celebrate! Path Wizard has been approved by Apple and the game is now for sale in the App Store. It is the result of many weekends and late nights filled with programming, debugging, drawing, composing and testing.

Here's a short summary of the development process when creating Path Wizard. I began working on the game March 23, 2010. Thinking I should be able to complete this game idea I had in about a month. I had been playing Ravensburger's board game The aMAZEing Labyrinth at my day job and thought its game play characteristics could be translated to an iPhone app. For you who haven't played the game I can give a short description; The goal is to take treasures in a labyrinth. The treasures has to be taken in a certain order described by a deck of cards that each player has. A player has won when he has taken all of the treasures in his deck. The game board consists of 50 bricks depicting turns, crossroads and straights in a maze. The bricks are laid in a 7x7 square and the one extra brick is used to push the rows and columns of the board to make paths. When a path is made between the player marker and the current treasure he can move the marker to the treasure and go on to the next treasure in his deck. A picture of the game board can be seen a few posts down.

Well this should be simple enough. I started to work on the game board graphics first, as I like doing graphics the most. It was a pretty quick job and I was done in about a day or two. Each brick was a compound of a base tile graphic that had a path image pasted on top of it. If a brick should have a treasure it was rendered on top of the previous base tile + path piece.

The treasure graphics took a bit longer to draw, a few days I think. I decided to go with 20 treasures and each had to be in two versions, one big and one small. The smaller treasures could quite easily be created from the bigger ones by scaling the graphic and then some minor adjustments.

When I got bored with drawing (it happens), I began working on the actual code. I decided to have each brick in its own c++ class and have them allocated in one big single array. The sound and graphics loading system could be reused from my previous project Apple Catcher, so I saved quite a bit of development time there. The two biggest problems to solve was the pushing of bricks into the game board and the control of the player and opponents. The first obstacle of pushing the bricks was eventually solved by some brick class copying and position pushing. It wasn't a big thing to conceptualize but it took its nice share of time to get to work just right. The controls was a bit harder to figure out. I had to know when a path had been made, which bricks it consisted of and which path was the best to take when the player or computer controlled player wanted to go to a certain location on it. This sounded like an A-star problem. I had an A-star routine laying around my HDD so I integrated it with my existing project with some frustration and hair loss. It happens that I needed to make at least twelve A-star searchers each time the AI should make a turn. There are twelve possible moves and hence twelve possible sets of bricks that the computer must choose from. If the computer could find a path to the desired brick in the third cycle I could of course break the process right there.

When I had made the brick pushing and A-star stuff I needed some sound effects, music and menus. I also had to make an intro and ending sequences. All this took a couple of weeks, so now I had already worked for over two months. *ugh* this turned out to take a while after all. No testing had been made and I hadn't any high score or loading/saving system in place. This kept the project going for about another three weeks.

However, finally I came to the conclusion that the game was "good enough" for release and last week I submitted it to the App Store. Ten days later the game is approved and made available for sale on the App Store. *woohoo* now onto fixing various bugs that haven't showed up yet. I love my hobby he he

The game can be found here for you that own an iPhone/iPod touch.

That's all for now, thanks for reading!
Sign in to follow this  


6 Comments


Recommended Comments

Congratulations on releasing your game! Mobile devices seem like a great place to replicate the days of yore where a single developer could create a complete game on their own and do well out of it (as long as you don't suffer from "programmer art", which you clearly do not). Top work!

Share this comment


Link to comment
More congratulations. I understand from other journals that getting to this stage with Apple can be a tough process.

I meant to comment recently on the artwork you were posting but didn't get round to it. Pretty damn good stuff there. What software/methods do you use? I honestly thought it was all hand painted on paper until I saw some of your breakdown stuff.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Lovely. I'll be sure to download it and see about writing up a little review for you.

(Oh, and one of your bullet points in the App Store description is, "Endless of puzzle solving"? [grin])

Share this comment


Link to comment
If only I had an iphone! I'm sure to pick this up as I'm planning on getting one once the 4th gen hits the market :)

Share this comment


Link to comment
Quote:
(Oh, and one of your bullet points in the App Store description is, "Endless of puzzle solving"? )


Oops, one of my generic bullet points that should have been left out. It is actually not endless, if you are not very bad at the game he he :)

benryves, Gazillion, Thank you!!

HopeDagger, thanks! I just read your last journal entry and I agree with you about the Life in Apple's World.

Aardvajk, I made the graphics in an animation/painting program called Pro Motion v6. It is developed by a smaller company and the software were not very expensive. It has borrowed a lot of its work flow and keyboard short-cuts from the old pixel painting program Deluxe Paint on the Amiga.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Quote:
Original post by O-san
Aardvajk, I made the graphics in an animation/painting program called Pro Motion v6. It is developed by a smaller company and the software were not very expensive. It has borrowed a lot of its work flow and keyboard short-cuts from the old pixel painting program Deluxe Paint on the Amiga.


I remember Deluxe Paint well. In many ways, every computer user in the world is influenced by the Amiga.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

We are the game development community.

Whether you are an indie, hobbyist, AAA developer, or just trying to learn, GameDev.net is the place for you to learn, share, and connect with the games industry. Learn more About Us or sign up!

Sign me up!