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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Lunch break review - Late February(ish)

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kseh

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Seems I'm late with a lot of stuff this past few weeks. Kept putting off working on my own game and putting up anything about the games that I've been playing. Not sure if I'll get a chance to work on my game, but here's the latest reviews.

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Cuboy Quest By: MoFunZone.com
Played 2011-02-22 on Addictinggames.com
[sup]K. Helfenstein - 2011-02-25[/sup]

The main character looks pretty retro so I gave this game a try expecting that sort of thing. It's got a fairly standard platform style to it with some levels including stuff like boxes as obstacles. The idea here is to shoot all the target pink things and then make it to the level exit. Have to admit, I was surprised when I found that the bullets persist should they come to a stop before falling off screen.


Will I play it again?
No, partly because I finished it. In general, it was ok but there was a sense that it was a game by an amateur who wanted to publish something that made basic use of whatever physics engine he had found. I also found that movement and jumping just didn't really feel right to me. That being said, I didn't exactly have high expectations for this game in the first place so after finding that I had completed all the levels and sort of enjoyed it, I guess I have to conclude that it wasn't bad.

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wOne

By: Sean Cooper

Played 2011-02-22 on Addictinggames.com
[sup]K. Helfenstein - 2011-02-25[/sup]

This game puts the player in control of a tire on a platformer sort of track. Gather up sufficient speed to make jumps or travel up walls in order to collect oil cans and stars. Collecting all of the oil cans allows the player to progress to the next level. The stars are placed in locations more difficult to get to and are just there to provide a challenge. I believe collecting all the stars in all levels unlocks the 6th level.

Will I play it again?
Nah. I found it enjoyable but it's the sort of game that you only play once. I was a bit surprised to find that this game only had 6 levels to it. It wasn't a bad thing but it made me wonder a bit if the author expected people to only play for a short while.

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Knights Vs Knights

By: Denis Rakitnykh
Played 2011-02-25 on Addictinggames.com
[sup]K. Helfenstein - 2011-02-25[/sup]

This is one of those match 3 type of games where there's something going on in the background which is affected by the matches that are made. In this case, in the background you have an army marching on a castle in the style of kind of Nob War style. Matching 3 symbols gives your army additional troops, or more speed, or otherwise attacks the defending castle. In the end, whichever side's troops are reduced to 0 is defeated.

Will I play it again?
Not likely. I'm not sure why I played it as long as I did. I generally like the whole match 3 thing with stuff going on in the back. But it didn't take long playing this one to see there was going to be a problem. While playing, the occasional unselectable block comes up. That's fine and all and expected in a lot of these games. Except that there's no way to get rid of them. I tried to look at it as an added challenge to work around them but I found that when you have quite a few of these blocks, you're likely to end up with no possible moves and no way to remedy that short of starting the level over. To be honest, this only happened a couple times while I was playing but it pretty much reduced the game to sheer luck.

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