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HLSL and a cool Direct3D debugging tool

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VBStrider

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I worked on the rendering system today. Because of the way I handle errors, there is a class for the D3D object, the device, vertex declarations, vertex buffers, vertex shaders, and pixel shaders. This is a little inconvenient, as the following code shows:

m_renderer->GetDevice()->BeginScene();
hResult = m_renderer->GetDevice()->DrawPrimitive(D3DPT_TRIANGLELIST, 0, 1);
if (hResult != D3D_OK)
{
throw (CException("Could not draw the triangle.\r\n\r\nError Code: 0x%08X", hResult));
}
m_renderer->GetDevice()->EndScene();


I'm considering having the classes manage global variables rather than member variables. That way, I can access the global directly in other parts of the code rather than through an object. I may try that in the next iteration.

Today marks the first time I have ever written and used a shader. This is something I have been wanting to do for a while, and it opens up some very interesting possibilities. For example, I can now make the screen fade to grey. I can also prevent players from being able to get around the darkness in a game by banding dark colors (I am currently working out how to do this exactly).

One thing which was a bit annoying for me while researching HLSL (a programming language you can use to write shaders) was being unable to find a simple, basic shader example. So here is a set of bare-bones, pass-through shaders which will hopefully help someone who wants to learn how to write shaders:

// ***** Vertex Shader *****
struct tVSInput
{
float3 pos : POSITION;
float4 diffuse : COLOR;
};

struct tVSOutput
{
float4 pos : POSITION;
float4 diffuse : COLOR;
};

tVSOutput main(tVSInput input)
{
tVSOutput output;

output.pos.xyz = input.pos.xyz;
output.pos.w = 1;
output.diffuse = input.diffuse;

return (output);
}
// *****


// ***** Pixel Shader *****
struct tVSOutput
{
float4 pos : POSITION;
float4 diffuse : COLOR;
};

float4 main(tVSOutput input) : COLOR
{
return (input.diffuse);
}
// *****


I should probably note that this is my first time writing these, so an expert may take issue with something in there. However, both shaders work perfectly fine in the tests I have ran, and they are nice and simple to read.

On the subject of shaders; if you use a shader model 3.0 vertex shader, you apparently need to also use a shader model 3.0 pixel shader. If you use a 2.0 vertex shader (or lower I am assuming), you can let the fixed function pipeline take care of the pixel shader part. Before I figured this out, I was a bit confused as to why the triangle I was using as a test wasn't appearing.

If you are using Direct3D, I highly recommend trying out PIX. PIX is a free utility that comes with the SDK. You can find it in the utilities folder in the SDK installation directory. It is pretty much a debugger for Direct3D; it monitors how the program you attach it to uses Direct3D and gives you a report after the program closes. It gives you a list of all created resources and the arguments used when creating them, you can take snapshots at runtime and later view what calls were made during that snapshot, and quite a bit more from the looks of it.

[size="1"]Reposted from http://invisiblegdev.blogspot.com/
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Thanks for posting this. Back when I was learning XNA I was trying to convert some shader code from ver 3 to 4. It was a real pain and fustrating because I only understood about 60% of what was going on. Talk about fustrating...

Now that I'm back using DX I will book mark this post.

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