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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Apologies. Also, game released.

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Little Coding Fox

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First off I'd like to apologise for the seemingly "lack of context" in my latest journals. That's what I get for not being used to writing these and being in a hurry all the time.

I've been working on a port of a very successful iOS game to Android for 9 months now, and yesterday the game was finally released. It consists of pushing (flinging) some furballs into other furballs in order to push them out of the game board, until you have only one furball left and "win" the puzzle. Some of you might remember it as "Fling!" on the iOS. Well, we kept everything exactly the same on Android, and you can buy it or try it.

For more on how the game is played you can also check this youtube video:
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I hope you like it, me and CandyCane LLC went past some very hard times porting this, and you can finally try our effort.

Cheers,
Nuno Silva.

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[quote]
me and CandyCane LLC went past some very hard times porting this
[/quote]
Stuff you can share?
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[quote name='Gaiiden' timestamp='1322925467']
[quote]
me and CandyCane LLC went past some very hard times porting this
[/quote]
Stuff you can share?
[/quote]

Things ranging from poor APIs (we were targetting Android 1.6 as the minimum OS version), to very poor tools, to your device suddenly rebooting from a stack overflow, to extremely poor support for native code, to even some java code that works in a way on one device to behave differently on another device.

E.g., their SoundPool class that would not let you know when a sound was done playing, or their MediaPlayer decided to throw exceptions when the documentation specifically said there not to be a thrown exception from a particular function, like the isPlaying method,

Another example would be that more often than not, Eclipse would decide to do stuff you didn't want and would be stubborn enough as to actually keep doing it no matter how many different attempts you did at whatever you were trying to do. One example was when I was linking a resource, and it would instead move the files to the folder where my main source was, and when I tried to remove the link, it'd delete my entire source folder, regardless of it saying it wouldn't delete the files.

A more recent example would be when I updated the Android SDK and the Eclipse ADT plugin and Eclipse decided to compile everything to .class files instead of building the app package. I had to do some serious hacking and to download 1.5GB of the old SDK from a friend since there was no other way to get an older version with the API levels I needed.

Another example would be the Native Development Kit (NDK)'s debugger script that ran GDB and would more often than not fail or otherwise would properly attach to the app, but ignore any crash or any interaction.

You'd also often get a crash, check the crash log on the logcat, and it'd give you a very poor callstack, usually with either no callstack or with only one frame (it missed all other frames or something similar). Sometimes we wouldn't even get a call stack, since it'd crash halfway while dumping the crash (seriously, this happened several times).
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