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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Another evolution in my project: Genegrafter

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darkpegasus

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Looking back, it's been quite some time since I posted and a lot has changed. For the better I hope.

I started with a game called iHero that was basically nothing more than a Mafia Wars clone with a superhero skinning. Looking at it now it's a bit embarrassing (both in design and code) but I think that also reminds me how much I've learned since then.

I'd like to start posting more details over the next few months as I work on finishing up the successor to the iHero project: Genegrafter.

During the course of development I found myself pulled in many directions while trying to create a full blown IP. One of which resulted in the following Kickstarter project: Genegrafter

In an attempt to simplify some game mechanics within the video game, I started creating physical representations of each item, character, and ability in the game using index cards. This really helped me to visualize how powers stacked and interacted in a less abstract way. But as you can see, it actually ran away with a life of its own and I plan on using the card game that came out of it as a mini-game within the Genegrafter video game.

I also participated in NaNoWriMo (a month long event in November in which authors write a book of 50K words or more from start to finish during the month) which helped me to flesh out my characters and story for the game. The goal is to outline each of these elements and hopefully shed some insight as to how the Genegrafter video game was managed from start to finish and, hopefully, becomes a recognized IP in its own right.

Thanks for taking the time to read this, and I look forward to sharing more with you soon.

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My kickstarter project just got approved as well, now I just have to make the video and artwork!
Congrats on yours, its looking like it will be successful, I will definitely be following it.
Good luck!
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Thanks,
I would warn you to make sure that you have carefully thought out absolutely everything before starting though. I set mine at 60 days thinking that would leave me a bit of time to safely add some videos and documentation before it became crucial.

I will tell you now that once the community latches onto your project they will want to see everything available to make an informed decision. I have to admit that I'm a bit of a Kickstarter whore and fund things based on pretty pictures alone sometimes, but most backers are not like that and will want to know they are getting at least their money's worth.

Also, and I can't stress this enough, figure out your marketing plan well before you hit that Launch button. Once you do, there's no turning back and the countdown begins. This means lining up all of your advertising banners (and preferably already securing ad spaces on various sites), having contests already established, and basically being a member of any forum or group that will listen. It looks easy enough to create a project but I will tell you from personal experience that it takes A LOT of legwork and posting to get people to talk about your project and even more to get them to fund it (even with the option to cancel at any time).

I thought I was ready to go with my campaign initially and I was really only about half there (look at my updates to see what I mean). And don't forget International backers, they have a lot of spending power that you'll miss out on if you don't include them.
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Why on earth would I have advertising banners on websites? That seems to defeat the purpose of kickstarter!
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Trust me, Kickstarter isn't as easy as just posting a project and people funding it. You have to do additional marketing/advertising unless you are lucky enough to end up being the anomaly project that gets funded without any additional advertising.
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