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Kickstarter - Hungry Fins and Drifter

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Programmer16

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Another Kickstarter project that needs some love: http://www.kickstart...fins-the-game-0

34 hours left and $2300 to go.

[edit]
I just realized I hadn't put Drifter out here yet, which is a shame. It's another iOS game, but if the Kickstarter funding is successful, there is supposed to be a PC/Mac port: http://www.kickstart...ce-trading-game

16 days left and $8000 to go.
[/edit]

[edit]
Forgot my disclaimer:
These are not my projects, these are games being developed by PepperDev Studios (Hungry Fins) and Celsius Game Studios (Drifter).
[/edit]

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Fun concept I think, but I am disappointed that PC is treated as the "bottom of the barrel". A bit of a slap in the face - when really PC is the most open platform - with the best development tools and the lowest cost of entry development of any platform.


[img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/f4/Wikimedia_OS_share_pie_chart.png[/img]

Granted, a lot of that blue region is business - there's got to be a good way to re-appeal to that larger market. I implore you - as an indy, think outside the current 'hip' iOS/Android box - think about that bigger picture. How can we get 'in the game' with the full game playing market?
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[quote name='Jeff.Leigh' timestamp='1337460402']
Fun concept I think, but I am disappointed that PC is treated as the "bottom of the barrel". A bit of a slap in the face - when really PC is the most open, with the best tools and the lowest cost of entry development of any platform.

Show a little love. iPhone and Android games aren't exactly in short supply. :/
[/quote]
I completely agree and honestly didn't realize that it was iOS only (at least for the moment.) However, from what I've seen, mobile games can get away with a lot shallower game, which would not only lower development time, but also make it easier. I liken them to Facebook games with less dependencies on the 'social' aspect.

PC will always be at the top of my list :)
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I agree - I love PC games, and clearly the PC is way, [i]way[/i] ahead technologically. (Last I thought looked, a PC with an iCore 7 was capable of about 70 gflops per second, while the iPad was still around oh.. 1 or 2.) You won't see the lastest Crysis or Unreal engine on iOS.

But really my point is... there are [b][i]hyped [/i][/b]markets, and then there are [b][i]real[/i] [/b]markets. These two things are not the same. Do you buy the [i]hype[/i], or do you market by [i]reality?[/i] 70% vs. 5.8%? Uhhhhhhh..... And Windows is placed at the bottom of the list?

I am at a loss here. The Apple market is simply [i]flooded[/i] with games at this point, no? The [i]windows market[/i], which is much, much larger[i] isn't flooded. [/i]Most PC games come from either retail purchases or via Steam downloads...

Isn't there a way indy developers can take advantage of this? Personally, it is something I grapple with.

(I appologize to Programmer16. This is off topic, and not really their problem to solve.... just kind of thinking here. I hope [i]discussion[/i] [i]here[/i] will not hurt Hungry Fin's exposure or their kickstarter all that much.)
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From what notice, PC games get less "hype" simple because a lot of people (at least people I know) prefer to use mobile devices, or they have an older operating system or a slow computer and the likes, But I agree, Many IOS or Android games can get away for less game play or even use ideas that we might call "Build your first" games.
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[quote name='Jeff.Leigh' timestamp='1337462488']
I agree - I love PC games, and clearly the PC is way, [i]way[/i] ahead technologically. (Last I thought looked, a PC with an iCore 7 was capable of about 70 gflops per second, while the iPad was still around oh.. 1 or 2.) You won't see the lastest Crysis or Unreal engine on iOS.

But really my point is... there are [b][i]hyped [/i][/b]markets, and then there are [b][i]real[/i] [/b]markets. These two things are not the same. Do you buy the [i]hype[/i], or do you market by [i]reality?[/i] 70% vs. 5.8%? Uhhhhhhh..... And Windows is placed at the bottom of the list?

I am at a loss here. The Apple market is simply [i]flooded[/i] with games at this point, no? The [i]windows market[/i], which is much, much larger[i] isn't flooded. [/i]Most PC games come from either retail purchases or via Steam downloads...

Isn't there a way indy developers can take advantage of this? Personally, it is something I grapple with.

(I appologize to Programmer16. This is off topic, and not really their problem to solve.... just kind of thinking here. I hope [i]discussion[/i] [i]here[/i] will hurt Hungry Fin's exposure or their kickstarter all that much.)
[/quote]

I agree and I understand where you're coming from; I've been baffled by this for the last couple years really. As an indie developer, I plan to try to rectify this situation.

Also, no apology needed; I'm glad I could help spark a discussion on the topic.


[quote name='cgpIce' timestamp='1337466044']
From what notice, PC games get less "hype" simple because a lot of people (at least people I know) prefer to use mobile devices, or they have an older operating system or a slow computer and the likes, But I agree, Many IOS or Android games can get away for less game play or even use ideas that we might call "Build your first" games.
[/quote]
They're also not new; PC games have been around for a while and not much 'new' has come out.
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[img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img] It can be strange and puzzling sometimes. On the one hand, iOS gets press... on the other, there are still a huge number of people enjoying MS solitare and minesweeper, who simply don't follow facebook and iOS trends. Question is, how to [i]reach [/i]and really excite that market. Hmmm..

Anyway, best of luck for your project - I think it looks fun!
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