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I am going to publish a game in 267 days.

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Burning Hand

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[extract]So I didn't see a place just to say, "Hi, I'm new here, but hey, this is me."
So hi! I'm new here, and this is me.

I'm going to publish a game.

I said it, I guess I could delete it and pretend I didn't, but I'm not.

I am going to publish a game. And I have 267 days to do it.
[/extract]
Kinda odd right? 267 days, not 268 or 365.

267.
See, my life hasn't been what I wanted. I've worked jobs I didn't want. I've gone back to school for jobs that didn't work out.
I don't want to crawl back into that. So I'm not going to.

I'm going to do what I've wanted to do for many years now.
I'm going to make a game.

I don't expect it to be easy, or for it to make me rich. I'm not Bioware or Blizzard.
I'm one guy, and I'm picking my battles and planning a path I can finish.
I will need help finding that path, but thats why I'm here.

267. And it's counting down. In 46 minutes it will be 266, I'd better get moving.

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11 Comments


I kind of like your approach. I do not know about your skill level or back ground, but you need help if you are only one person.
Here is some help:[list]
[*]Buy/find an engine that is really good
[*]Buy/find the art that you need to use in the game
[*]Buy/find the music you need
[*]Say goodby to weekends and drinking
[/list]
Engine choices:

Here is a link that you MUST read: [url="http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/128765/Opinion_Why_On_Earth_Would_We_Write_Our_Own_Game_Engine.php"]http://www.gamasutra.com/view/news/128765/Opinion_Why_On_Earth_Would_We_Write_Our_Own_Game_Engine.php[/url]

Well that is pretty much that. Welcome to the hard and very bitter road of the indies :)
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I am planing on Unity free version. I've spent a lot of years not making a game, which involved enough research to know that Unity is solid and still affordable, even if I pay for pro. The game concept I'm going for is low on art assets, so I hope to be able to create what I do need. Music I will need to find a solution to.

Anyway, thank you all, I was hoping to make a positive impression and it seems I did.
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One of the biggest tips I can give for anyone looking to be sucessful in completing a project, is to write an in depth Design Document for your project! This will be the blue print for your house, well game in your case.

Good luck, and keep us posted!
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[quote name='Black-Rook' timestamp='1342993827']
One of the biggest tips I can give for anyone looking to be sucessful in completing a project, is to write an in depth Design Document for your project! This will be the blue print for your house, well game in your case.
[/quote]

I'm aware of the idea of them, but don't know much specific. Any resources for writing them, teplates to follow, etc?
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[quote name='Burning Hand' timestamp='1342994544']
I'm aware of the idea of them, but don't know much specific. Any resources for writing them, teplates to follow, etc?
[/quote]

Basically, put your entire concept down on paper. Read it over several times, make sure -YOU- like it and -YOU- understand it. Also, a good tip here is notice what your game is not. Scope your effort and make sure you're comfortable with that. After all that, then proceed to break it down into features to fulfill that concept (i.e., elicit the functional requirements). Then stare at those for a while. Make sure they make sense, that to you, they are accomplish-able and satisfy your concept. Then stare at them again, figure out how you would roughly make those mechanics work (i.e., elicit the technical requirements). The Key here is ROUGHLY. What you implement will almost never be 100% of your vision at this point. Think how they may interact with other areas of the game, make notes. Make lists for each of these sections of entrance and exit criteria (i.e., what you need to start it, and when you can tell its "done" or "done enough").

After that, proceed to build your game. Start sections when you meet entrance criteria, and finish them off by testing your exit criteria. Once all your requirements are "done" you should have a game.

Also, don't expect to get it 100% right the first go-through, good chance you'll forget something, miss something, or have an epiphany or two along the way. Just always be aware of the scope of your project [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
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Wow, so apparently I've been talking to you on the forums all day. Welcome to Journal Land!
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Some tips:
To be contrary to black-rook: avoid a dpeth design document when working alone (it is like talking to yourself, there's nobody else to communicate your game idea to). Though pinning down your ideas before are always good, a more [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agile_software_development"]agile software development[/url] approach could be more helpful.

Target a game in 133 days, this will help to focus your ideas and fight overestimations. The rest of your 267 days will be needed to get your game actually running and polished.

Btw., cool journal entry and good luck.
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