• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.

J of K

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
  • entries
    14
  • comments
    47
  • views
    20554

Updated: Why you shouldn't use Dev-C++

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
jbadams

1863 views

Just a quick update this time:- I've updated my popular 2008 blog post on "Why you shouldn't use Dev-C++", and also moved to a new url -- the old one has a re-direct page for now, but I probably won't host that for ever.

The article can now be found at http://clicktobegin.net/programming/why-you-shouldnt-use-dev-c/

Please update any bookmarks. smile.png


I'm planning a follow-up entry discussing the merits of using an updated version of Dev-C++, as I've recently seen a bit more awareness of wxDev-C++ and the much newer Orwell Dev-C++.

2
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0


9 Comments


Honestly the only reason Dev-C++ is even brought up is because there are many old tutorials out there that recommend Dev-C++, in practice pretty much all programmers that were using Dev-C++ have switched to Code::Blocks by this point (especially since on Windows it uses MinGW, which is the same toolchain Dev-C++ was using).
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
I hope for the love of everything holy in this world, people never recommend Dev-C++ (Hasn't been updated in over 6 years!!!). I remember using it a long time ago, and even then I didn't like it. With Visual Studio Express, there is no reason to even suggest Dev-C++. I would sooner use Code:Blocks!

Great article jbadams! :)
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
Very nice article. The only time when I've used Dev-C++ was in college, when they learned people C/C++ programming (is was a pain, as there were better solutions already available, but academic teaching programs don't change too often... anyway that was eons ago :P ).

As for the alternatives Code::Blocks' nice (been using it for some time on Linux), but I don't know about Visual Studio Express. I've heard some rumors that the licensing is about to change for the new versions, so that you can only use it freely for Metro programming (still I hope these really are just rumors).
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
There used to be a huge number of people using Dev C++, but I haven't seen it mentioned on GameDev for a few years now. Is it really still much of a problem?
You should add QtCreator to the list of IDE alternatives - it's very mature, and very capable.

@sik_the_hedgehog: When I started using Dev C++ it was because it came on the CD with the programming book I got (C++ for Dummies).
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
[quote name='MoroS84' timestamp='1343127715']
I've heard some rumors that the licensing is about to change for the new versions, so that you can only use it freely for Metro programming (still I hope these really are just rumors).
[/quote]

Just to squish this rumor here; that isn't the case.
At one point they were talking about doing a 'Metro only' version but the community feedback made them change their mind and VS2012 will have 'metro' and 'classic desktop' editions now.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
[quote name='Servant of the Lord' timestamp='1343149431']
There used to be a huge number of people using Dev C++, but I haven't seen it mentioned on GameDev for a few years now. Is it really still much of a problem?
[/quote]
There's a [b]lot[/b] less usage than there used to be, and misguided recommendations to use it are fortunately still few and far between -- I almost didn't bother moving and updating the article. Unfortunately however, there are still plenty of beginners finding it recommended by older tutorials, and some of them recommend it to others.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
Good to see the article alive and well. I'll second Servant's suggestion to add QtCreator to the alternatives now. It really has developed into an IDE that can play in the big boys' sandpit now.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment
I'll take a look at QtCreator and consider adding it -- I'm not comfortable blindly recommending something I can easily try out, but I'm willing to consider additional suggestions -- I would also prefer to avoid the article ending up with an attempt at some exhaustive list of options though; the main point is to keep people away from Dev-C++.

//EDIT: I've added a short entry for QtCreator, as from a brief poke around and everything I've heard it seems to be a pretty solid option.
0

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now