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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Watching people play games...

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Bluefirehawk

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... doesn't sound creepy at all does it?

I had to write in ruby, didn't have a lot of sleep and just ate a piece of chocolate, hellllooo rambling time!

Soooo in this weeks post I talk about... what did you guess? About watching people play games.

For quite some time I've been into watching people play video games on youtube. I especially like SSoHPKC and the Creature stuff they do, but that is an other story, maybe for an other rambling post.
To those who don't know them, they essentially record themselfes playing video games and talking about random stuff.
The weird thing is, I think it does more than just entertain me, I think it helps me looking at game design from a more neutral standpoint.
"You are weird" you say? I have to tell you: I am watching people play games, what do you think I should be?!

But in all seriousness, it really does. More often than not, the commentary breaks the atmosphere of the game. "Why should that be a good thing" you say? Well, sometimes it seems games brush over bad design or bad story elements by providing an atmosphere that draws the players attention away.
Breaking away the atmosphere with the commentator shouting "SHOTGUN RAAAIIIIN" lets you notice all the dips and bumps.
The best example: try watching Call of Duty: Black ops, or COD: MW3 for that matter.
The singleplayer SUCKS! The story gets increasingly embarassing, the gameplay has stayed the same since Modern Warfare 1, the only thing that makes the singleplayer acceptable is the atmosphere. The distributed "I am so awesome" events like breaching and a few total badassery moments at the end of the game to make you forget about it.
COD: Black Ops at least TRIED to have an interesting story, they put effort in a plottwist that you maybe could not have seen coming.
But the latest MW3... seriously?! Have you ever had a knive in your heart, didn't care about bleeding, survived a World War 2 emergency medical procedure and walked around shooting stuff few days later? Was he faith healed by Peter Popoff? They didn't even try...
I couldn't watch SSoH play MW3, it just was too boring. Same shit, different day. On the other hand, watching him play Batman: Arkham Asylum was just awesome. Not only becaue he failed hilariously, but even by watching the game, I was drawn into the world of this game.

But back to watching people... play games...
Usability engineers have a technique called "talking out loud", they try to encourage a test person to talk out loud what he/she thinks while using the gui. This isn't just for shits&giggles, it helps evaluating the design, finding design errors. In other words, there are people on youtube doing exactly that for video games! For free! Day and Night!


Next week is business as usual, better structure and fleshed out thoughts. For today, I just wanted to ramble around a bit. See you soon!

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