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Windchasers still under way...

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mikeman

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So, for anyone that read my previous entries...I am still working on WindChasers, between job and college. Here's a gameplay video I recorded just some days ago:



I can't say I have much trouble developing the game, its biggest challenges is tweaking the physics, which is an ongoing process, and developing the 'AI' of the opponents so that races are challenging and fun. it's just that I need time to balance the gameplay, purchase more art content, designing the levels and generally polishing.

I'm unsure what I'm going to do when I finish it. Technically wise, I think the graphics have reached a point which is close to 'ok' for a game made by one person...OTOH the bar today is raised quite high and frankly even in the indie scene there are high demands. I don't think I would had much luck asking money for this game on PC, on the contrary it is more likely that if I released it as freeware at least some people would play it. It's a start. On a brighter note though, there are some plans of porting it to Android and iOS. Those platforms are a different story altogether, I think the graphics and the style of the game could justify putting a price on it.

One of the challenges with this plan is giving the incentive for someone that has the free PC version to buy the priced mobile version, and vice versa. I think having a fast-paced action racing game like that in a mobile device is an incentive in itself, as its mostly comprised of self-contained quick races/challenges that last, say, 3 or 4 minutes. You could play some rounds when in the bus or waiting in line in the bank, put it down and continue later. For the PC, a nice bonus would be to release the editor with the game, and allow players to create their own tracks. It would be an undertaking to make the editor really useable for the everyday gamer with the creative edge, but it's worth the try I think.

Lastly, I'm thinking about multiplayer. It could probably make a big difference, especially if I manage to achieve seamless multiplayer between Android/iOS/PC platforms.

That is all for today folks, as always, comments are welcome and appreciated :)

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I might have given you the lecture before, but anyway, the one thing I can think of is, what will you do to set your game apart from the rest of the crowd?

There are plenty of futuristic racers out there - all fairly similar to wipeout:
[img]http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/9/9c/PSX_Wipeout.png[/img]#

What are you going to do that is "different" as opposed to better (n.b. everybody thinks their game is better) from games such as this? OR these,

[url="http://store.steampowered.com/genre/Racing/"]http://store.steampowered.com/genre/Racing/[/url]

Think hard about this.
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A valid question speciesUnknown, but really, what did *this* game did different to set it apart?

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=net.osaris.turbofly&hl=el

As you can see, it's in the 50,000-100,000 download range, which is pretty good.

Still, as I said, a valid question, and one thing I will do different is in the structure of the campaign. Instead of playing fairly linear sets of challenges, the pilot will start his career with an amount of credits, and in each round he will be able to choose which challenge he will enter, and gain more credits and points based on his position and achievements. Using those credits, he will be able to upgrade and customize his vehicle(hopefully the customization will be visible on the vechile), buy a new one, increase the stats of its pilot(a bit of RPG here), purchase special perks, and so on.
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First time I've seen this and it's looking good :D

Some steeper climbs and maybe some jumps might help break the track up a bit; maybe some different 'sectors' inside a track too - although thats more of an art problem than a game play one :)

Still, looking good - keep up the good work :D
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Good work! In addition to climbs and jumps I'd also suggest adding loops and perhaps some wide open areas (+shortcuts).
As you apparently featured missiles in your games, some sort of radar lock system would also be great :). That way missiles
couldn't be launched instantly, you'd have to wait and let it target first (you could also make the missile more powerful)!
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I'm not using an existing engine, I coded this in C++ and OpenGL, using middleware like Newton for physics, and C#/Winforms for the editor.

It would be more rational indeed to use a ready engine such as UDK or Unity, and that's what I'd advise anyone; I just choose to write it from scatch for learning purposes :)
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Agree with what everyone said about climbs and jumps, it would look great and feel great, I can get an awesome feeling of speed from what I see there, some jumps and it would feel cool. Being able to improve your ship and that kind of stuff would also be great. Starting with a small, junkie ship. That could be the "different" aspect, not starting awesome, but getting awesome. Maybe adding some story on the back, so it's like a futuristic Need for Speed thing?
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