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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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I can die happy now! For realsies...

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Bluefirehawk

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...yes, I really am that happy.

"Why" do you ask? Simply put:
IT WORKS!! HAHAAAAAAA!!!! SUCK ON THAT SEVENTH CIRCLE OF DEV. HELL!! Screw you guys, I'm going home.

(If you haven't noticed already, this entry has the Rambling tag)

It works, I still cannot really believe it, I feel a bit lightheaded from that, or maybe it's the hangover, or the chocolate flash, I don't KNOW and I don't CARE, It WORKS.
I've found my light, my saviour, my knight in shining armour. Alright that sounded a bit gay, but moving on. Hail the almighty [color=#B22222]

QTCREATOR.

[/color]I finally have everything besides the coding. Everything I that was so nervewracking, i can really start to do what I came here to do: Program a game and chewing bubble gum. And I am all out of gum! DUN DUN DUUUUN!
And to beat ass, never forget to beat ass...

"So why is it so good?" QTCreator WORKS! YES! It is easy to install on all platforms I currently want to develop on (windows+debian), a QMake script is fairly easy to understand and yet the easiest Makefile generator script I've found. It as a powerful testing framework and I think the most intuitive switching between "editing, debug..." views. The editor itself is pretty much what you'd expect in an IDE these days.
It's not without it's faults, the "add library" dialogue only allows for .lib files, whick is pretty anoying for your .dlls. Sometimes the design tries to be too posh, too much "Look at me, I am a hip, cool IDE! Not your nerdy Visual Studio, nobody laughs at you when you use me!" I don't need a good looking IDE. It has to work and be productive, I don't care how it looks.

The next weeks post is a bit more structured and maybe a bit depressive, because it is not the day that you think it is. I write these entries sometimes weeks earlier. My entry two weeks ago "Watching people play games..." was written back in August. But the Context never seemed right to post it, so I always pushed this entry further back. I started writing this entry back in october, but you see this in the middle of october, I am actually writing to you from the past!!
That means, sometimes you have an outdated project update and sometimes posts that follow are older than the current post, like in this case. I actually have the next 2-3 entries almost completely written. Next weeks post is older and maybe a bit depressing, hopefully you still find some value in it.


I'm already rambling, I feel like writing some more: WTF, my post was featured? I don't know what the requirements are to get your post featured, I don't know if a human or an algorithm selects the featured entries. If it was a human, I have no idea why he or she thought the entry "Watching people play games..." was so good. I've written most of it in an hour, didn't put much thought in it and even I thought it wasn't terribly interesting. Maybe mildly entertaining, but that's it.
I don't want to bitch around, I like being featured, it makes me feel important. I just don't understand why this entry, and not one of those I actually put hard work in it.

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[quote]I'm already rambling, I feel like writing some more: WTF, my post was featured? I don't know what the requirements are to get your post featured, I don't know if a human or an algorithm selects the featured entries. If it was a human, I have no idea why he or she thought the entry "Watching people play games..." was so good. I've written most of it in an hour, didn't put much thought in it and even I thought it wasn't terribly interesting. Maybe mildly entertaining, but that's it.
I don't want to bitch around, I like being featured, it makes me feel important. I just don't understand why this entry, and not one of those I actually put hard work in it.
[/quote]

Well, it was a good idea. Too many people design a game the way they want to play it. Many people make the mistake of not thinking about how other people play games. Most people learn these lessons in focus testing, which is essentially watching people play your game. So watching people play other people's games isn't too far a stretch for perhaps picking up some outside perspective.

I hand pick all the featured posts, BTW. It's ok tho people have called me a robot before.

Generally I want insightful topics, which I found your game watching post to be, or game dev tutorials/articles but those are usually in short supply (only because the majority of journal updates is straight-up project progression) so usually I default to download postings (alpha/beta/release), big project news (publishing/kickstarter/etc), or videos I see a good deal of effort have been put into (narrated gameplay walkthroughs, how-tos, making-ofs, etc).
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hmmm, very interesting read... And as for Gaiiden's post, I might start writing about my design process in more depth rather then using this site just to dump my projects progress :-) I never really sat back and thought about it.

Writing insightful posts is not my strong point.
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