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Classic RPG #1 - Task 6 - Update 1 (Sword Sprites)

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Programming020195BRook

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Hello everyone!

I've tried to update the swords to make it more clear the Bronze, Iron, and Steel are indeed different. The game will show a text description either way.

Below you will see the new swords on top, and previous ones below.

gallery_193889_335_1171.jpg

Now, to describe how items work in the game! Each item has what you would call a level, or grade. There are no level restrictions to use such item, however it will cost gold! Much like Dragon Warrior, you had to kill enough monsters to buy the weapons. The only difference in this game is that you have a chance of finding any grade of item!

I'm currently finishing the programming for the inventory with these items and the loot system. I will then post a video on Sunday to show off my progress. This should also conclude Task 6!

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Looking nice. Have you tried making the swords actually have a different shape, not only recoloring? That might help seeing the difference in a glance.
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Thanks! The real purpose of this game is just to get a 2D Classic RPG engine made. Art can be modified at anytime. I've programmed the engine to the point where you can make several types of classic RPG's! :)
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[quote name='Black-Rook' timestamp='1350203515']
Thanks! The real purpose of this game is just to get a 2D Classic RPG engine made. Art can be modified at anytime. I've programmed the engine to the point where you can make several types of classic RPG's! [img]http://public.gamedev.net//public/style_emoticons/default/smile.png[/img]
[/quote]
[b]So 2D classic RPG[/b], like [i]Robot Rescue[/i] and [i]1001[/i] [i]Crystal Mazes[/i]? See [url="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maze_game#Top-down_maze_games"]Maze Games[/url]. But you employ RPG dynamics from primal RPG knowledge. Does your platform make use of the classic adventure random events? Random events in proto-RPG development changed player dynamics and provided more control and leverage to the "gamemaster." For the 2D classic RPG platform, the program is the "gamemaster," providing information to the players and initiating successive protocols for display and non-display. It is this way, I believe, you can adjust your system for random events, by having not only viewable events, but also non-viewable random events placed into the maps of your platform (s). When players contact this space, the non-viewable encounter is randomized and then placed on the map as a viewable encounter. Players can received a drop-down option menu at this point where they can select several options, such as "stay and fight" and "retreat." This was the original concept of random events/encounters developed for proto-RPG, but the "gamemaster" would select a standard "time period" in which to conduct random encounters. This was due to the actualization of the movement space, such as an actual ground map and the rules of the game. Polyhedral dice were used to randomize the encounter chances and to randomize the nature of the encounter.

Can you give me any info about this [url="http://www.ambrosine.com/resource.html"]Game Creation 1[/url] and [url="http://www.ambrosine.com/resource.php"]Game Creation 2[/url].

Let me know what you think in any case. Cyal8r.
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Hello Numenor,

My Classic RPG doesn't really run like the Maze games. (Note: the maze look in the demo and video is for testing purposes.)

Dragon Warrior runs very much like you described in a sense of random events and a popup screen for fight, run, item usage, ect...

I've seen both pages "Game Creation 1" and "Game Creation 2". Some links are outdated, like the Game Maker one. There are some good links on those pages, I remember these pages from many years back. Is there anything you're looking for on those pages?
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Sooo, you've actually got a "programmed engine" within the form you need. Is that correct?

[b]Not sure because I'd like information [/b]on using various applications, et al., to build a Fantasy RTS, for example. It's in the future, however. I still have some reseach to conduct, esp. the importance of C++ and C# within the 2D top-down view of an RTS environment. The RTS is a function of my MMORPG3. I'm still working on the outlines contents, functions, navigation, et al.

Yeah, [i]Dragon Warrior [/i]is using the original concept of [i]D&D[/i]; that is random events and the options on how to conduct them, although they are in digital mode and code--a substantial format change. [i]Dragon Warrior[/i] appears much like a form of the [i]Adventure[/i] game. Are you using the [i]Adventure [/i]game and [i]D&D[/i] as annotations for [i]Dragon Warrior[/i]?
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Yes the engine for the most part has been programmed to handle the events needed for the RPG. I'm not using D&D rules, just basic stat calculations.
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[b]Well I understand the math involved in programming[/b]--a necessity of course. That is a necessity in configuring programs for an i/o computer. With sprites, you must be detailing the aesthetics of the artwork. No, it's much easier to use, and some instances, more dynamic (call it quicky) than the D&D rule source. You are aware of the annotation process?

Proto-RPG development had taken place prior to 1974. There weren't any D&D rule sources on the market at that time. During 1974, the first printing of D&D was established on the market. This might be identified as primal RPG escalation. The proto-test of the [i]Castle Greyhawk Campaign[/i] established D&D on the world market. There were many original concepts that were tested and included into the body and functions of the first, and subsequent, printings of D&D. Some of these concepts, such as a Sword & Sorcery fighting--reading any author of S&S, or science-fiction, if you require--was not really original, like creating conworlds, also. The conception of randomizing encounters for participants was an original invention, propogated for randomizing encounters in a game format.
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Yes, math indeed is a very important part in computer programming, but not a high level is required if you're only sticking to 2D games without complex physics. I'm aware of the annotation process, those that never use it in programming are looking for major problems the bigger their code gets, and the longer the project is. There of course is many ways one will use annotations in programming, either by design document, run type command displays, comment code, ect...
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