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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Portas Aurora Recap

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Navyman

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The Kickstarter project for Portas Aurora: Arrival from September was not a success in terms of raising the capital to help produce the game. However, it was amazing. We received tons of feedback, and met dozens of great people making this last month a successful month. For more information on the data we collected from the Kickstarter project I will be posting another entry.

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The team behind the Portas Aurora project were hit with a large chunk of life after the close of the Kickstarter campaign leading to the game being placed on the back burner. We had discussed other opinions to continue the development of Portas Aurora: Arrival and we are not wanting to let the project fall by the waste side. With the new year the remaining members of the team looked to pick Portas Aurora backup only to discover a massive amount of assets had been lost or destroyed between multiple moves. Even with multiple copies and backup the game as it was is a shell. The team has joked that it is not a over huge lost because many of the comments we received targeted at the graphics were that they were sub-par and needed to be reworked leaving us with a clean slate.

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If you have have some ideas, we would enjoy hearing them.

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Thank you.

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4 Comments


Are you moving to a new project all together? or will you attempt to redo the missing assets? I have a few people I could probably throw your way who are looking to make models but they are by far nothing of industry grade or level. Could be of use to you though.

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The best of a failure is always the experience you take with you, but you need to accept the experience and don't wave it aside as unfortunate events.

 

 

Even with multiple copies and backup the game as it was is a shell.

I do not want to sound rude, but this is a clear sign of unorganised project handling, you should rethink your approach (team up => kickstart to get money) in such a situation.

 

Maybe it would be a good idea to take the surviving team, even cutting off some teammembers to form a core team, and prototype a little game project in a given timebox (3-6 month). Build the prototype as throwaway prototype, just to evaluate your own skills, estimations and to form a good working team.

 

A good working team will slice through development like butter, and much better then a larger, though unexperienced, team. You might come to the conclusion, that it will not work out and you need more experiences (in this case you have saved you and your team some horrible headache and given them some pretty valuable experiences) or you feel that it will work out (in this case your experiences and team spirit will speed up the development of a next project). In both cases it is a win-win.

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Ashaman brings up some good points. I know that we have had to redo many things in the past because we just did not have the experience needed to do what we wanted. Organization became my job and has been since that point. With the purchase of some tracking software and weekly meetings we have increased our productivity 10 times what we use to do. Oddly, it doesnt seem that way since we are now taking on bigger tasks!  :P

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It is true that the game assets that were lost were sub par materials and that their lose my end up being a good thing. Still it hurts to lose something that ate so much time.

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