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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Put Yourself Out There!

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Plethora

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My starting point for this entry is this... I've been a hobbyist type developer for a number of years. I have, at various times, started a project (always on my own) worked on it for a few weeks, then dropped it. Most of the time I would move away from programming entirely in between projects. I never talked about my ideas, got input on my design, or anything like that. In some sense that's fine... until the more recent past I never viewed myself as a game developer, I was just a guy who messed around with code once in awhile. But that said, now that I really am making this a focus in my life, I realize the importance of putting myself out there.

I've been keeping this journal here. This is Entry #4, so its not exactly a huge achievement, admittedly, but its one thing I'm doing. I have a small website with terrible looking screenshots, and I keep a more informal journal there as well. That journal details the game itself and the direction I'm moving in on that game. I've also started attending meetings of my local IGDA chapter, and if I am able to make the time I'd like to catch on with the indie developer community in Boston (the biggest city near me).

The thing is, all these things help me in two ways...

  1. The first way is obvious... it puts my name out there, it helps me network, meet people, and it gives me additional resources when I'm doubting my design, or I'd like some individual guidance from someone who might have been in my position before. I had some business cards made, and I have a small collection of them from other people.
  2. The second and less obvious way it helps me is that is pushes me forward. See, when I kept everything to myself I had no real reason to push myself to finish anything. It was just a past-time, nothing more. Now, not only do I have a lot more desire to make progress on my project so that I can show it off, I've also gotten a great deal of encouragement from many different people. It's easy to look at the process of making a game and just despair at the enormity of it all. Having people around you that are going through the same thing is an amazing feeling.

As I've tried to say on this journal before... I am not a professional developer. The game I'm working on is nothing special, and like many, I'm full of big ideas with little of substance to show for it. But I have more confidence in myself and my project now than I have ever had in anything before, and I owe so much of that to the fact that I have taken significant steps to join a community of people trying very hard to do the same.

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Yes you are correct. Good thing. Also congratulations for being down on Earth.

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NIce man.  I happened upon this article at the right time because I am going through the same thing.  This is encouraging.  Thanks for putting yourself out there for other to be pushed to move forward as well.  Good luck to you.

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Nice job! l've the same feeling with you,but l'm in  thinking state,and not start.So from your text,l really study somthing very meaningful for me.Thanks.

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This also is double-edged sword, in case your gameplay idea happens to be decent and you reveal gameplay based information on your blog/journal. Someone with more resources will just steal your idea, make the game and bam, thats the reality. I suggest being carefull what you put out there, not everything should be revealed.

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This also is double-edged sword, in case your gameplay idea happens to be decent and you reveal gameplay based information on your blog/journal. Someone with more resources will just steal your idea, make the game and bam, thats the reality. I suggest being carefull what you put out there, not everything should be revealed.

 

I firmly disagree with that view on things for a whole lot of reasons.  For one thing, a finished game is defined much much more by its implementation rather than any idea it was originally built around.  For another thing, getting outside input from as many sources as possible is far more beneficial to any project than the potential risk of having some concepts "stolen".

 

This article addresses this far better than I ever could:

 

http://www.lostgarden.com/2005/08/why-you-should-share-your-game-designs.html

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