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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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My two favorite ideas

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DareDeveloper

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Hi again,

I think I will replace the current content of the site ConceptWorld.org with a more simple site and take a lean startup approach to see if it can go viral without much effort.
The idea is that I can concentrate on developing the platform while a developing community creates the appeal of the world ... not doing my work for me, but working on their own commercial projects.
I will write more about the philosophy in the "Thoughts And Convictions" category. As a first project I think an anthology or a serial (published as an ebook ... and if the demand justifies it as a print version using the service CreateSpace) might be a great, first project.
Would have loved to program the server side with Node.js ... but I can't set that up (the redirect to port 8888).

The 2nd idea is working on a multiplayer sports game with a web portal behind it. That would mean people could play tournaments and keep track of their accomplishments.
The players would be controlled in a way that is comparable with Starcraft II micro. I would probably start with a soccer implementation but keep it abstract and generic enough to allow for other implementations.
The plan is documenting the whole development process and releasing the documentation as tutorials ... and releasing the code as open source on github. The focus would not be on the pogramming languages or the game mechanics, but on the big picture knowledge and the required skills like project management, programming concepts, software architecture, build process options / continuous integration and things like that (mentioning several other ways to do the same thing and showing links to further information).
People should be able to follow along while programming a very different kind of game.

I have 4.5 years of programming experience as a Java programmer, but I want to get into C++ again and learn some new things while working on the project. I am hoping to get feedback when I am stuck or when tutorials are wrong or incomplete ... so that this turns into a living community project.
Currently the plan is using

  • C++ and OpenGL for a game client
  • GWT, with Gin (for IOC) for a web portal
  • GWT, with Guice (for IOC) or Node.js for a game server
  • SCRUM for project management (yes, I like using that approach even as a lone wolf)
  • Maybe Jenkins for Continuous integration
  • Ant for the web server and portal build process, maybe Maven for dependencies
  • JUnit for web server and portal unit tests (maybe TDD - Test Driven Development)
  • Not sure which technology for the build process of the game client (should be portable Win, Lin, Mac ... mobile only if there is a smart way to support a gamepad - it might not work without the precision of a mouse)
  • GIT as the version control system
  • Is is allowed to release articles on Gamedev.net and another website?

    The goals:

    • A 3D sports game (easy to learn, hard to master)
    • A portal website that stores results and maybe profiles with achievements
    • Maybe a coaching mode where players and teams can get better
    • A simple, generic game client engine
    • Tutorials that show the big picture of how you can think like a programmer
    • Maybe a simple local game server that allows for a single player mode.

      If possible there could be a NeHe like site that shows implementations of the same thing with different technologies and different approaches that solve the same problems.

      I might host a game server and add a supporter subscription feature to try to make some money at some point ... or sell the tutorials as an ebook or as video tutorials.

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