• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
  • entries
    45
  • comments
    268
  • views
    66037

An experiment in game promotion: Part #1 Results

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
boolean

1571 views

It's been a week since I started game promotion experiment #1. I wanted to see how useful different promotion techniques were for my new game Stupid Human Castles.

Experiment #1 was to see how useful posting on a series of forums around the interwebs would be. The ones I settled on were:

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]gamedev.net[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]libGDX forums[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]TIGSource[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]reddit.com/r/indieGaming[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]reddit.com/r/androidGaming[/font][/color]
[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]javagaming.org[/font][/color]

I tried posting on a few other forums like indiegaming and indiedb, but ran into problems. Most forums I came across were pretty restrictive about new members posting their game without having a history on the site.

The Results:



[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]gamedev.net[/font][/color]

I posted a thread in the announcements forum with a title that could have been better. The thread itself had about 210 views, of which a grand total of 16 people went and played the demo.

C6YO03U.png

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]libGDX forums[/font][/color]

The thread had 250 views, of which 10 people clicked through to the demo.

IlQSwAU.png

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]TIGSource[/font][/color]

The thread had 95 views, of which a whopping 4 people clicked through to the demo!

Azw7EPy.png

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]javagaming.org[/font][/color]

I'm still a little confused by the stats from javagaming. The thread itself has had over 1100 views which is far and above any other posts I made. They have a brilliant way of presenting new games by having a screenshot presented next to the game itself. Not only that, but new games posted in the showcase forum are advertised on the sidebar throughout the site. It's fantastic exposure and I would love to see more forums adopt this system.

The part that confuses me is that despite having 1100 people view the thread, only 66 people clicked through to the demo. There was some good discussion in the thread so I'm a bit confused why the click-through rate is so low.

TCSaVnx.png


[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]reddit.com/r/indieGaming[/font][/color]
(I'm not 100% sure how to merge the different URLS from reddit together into one view, so this will be just text.)

From /indieGaming my post recieved 2 upvotes and 26 people clicking through to the demo.

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]reddit.com/r/androidGaming attempt #1: 13 click-throughs[/font][/color]

[color=rgb(40,40,40)][font=arial]I had about the same as indieGaming for the first two days, which was about 1-2 upvotes and about 13 click through's. [/font][/color]

--------------------------
Now at this point I was pretty disappointed with the views I was getting. It was around now I wanted to try a different take on the title. I had originally chosen a name that I thought sounded intriguing, but my number of views was telling me otherwise. I spent the next day trying out various ideas and then posted a new thread on /androidGaming.


reddit.com/r/androidGaming attempt #2: 600 click-throughs

At this point I had a new title which was targeted more to people who like tetris. I think by ensuring that the people who were checking out the post were already interested in tetris, it made them much more likely to stick around and try the demo. Because of this I had about 600 views come through over the next few days. It was the first day I actually started making sales.


What I learnt about forum posts.



1) A catchy title is important, but it's probably not the one you think it is. It wasn't until i started experimenting with different titles that my game started getting any attention. I thought I had an interesting title, but what I thought was pretty good turned out to be kinda rubbish. It takes quite a few attempts to really narrow down the most attention grabbing part of your game and it's not always obvious how to present that.

2) Getting views is important, but targeting a demographic is better. I think the problem I ran into at the start was that people were seeing the title of the thread, looking at some screenshots and then thinking "oh tetris? I hate tetris!" and closing the thread. It wasn't until people could see what the game was like before clicking through that it began converting to click-throughs and sales. I would suggest then that instead of coming up with a title like "XMan - An rpg set on the moon" which could get a lot of views, it's ok to go very specific and say "XMan - A top down rpg in the style of FF2".

3) Most showcase/announcement forums are flooded. I already knew this going in, but I thought with some nice screenshots I could stand out. With the exception of java-gaming.org, most threads are pushed off the front pages too fast to be of any use. When I would find a thread with 10+ posts to see what they were doing different, it was usually the developer talking to himself smile.png

4) WIP (Work in Progress) or general feedback boards are much better than Announcement boards. Finding that it's better to use forums for gameplay feedback rather than promotion, the WIP forums are much more useful. Showcase forums just move too fast to be of much use, but WIP forums give a much longer exposure of your game and will get you much better feedback.

5) Finding indie forums to post advertisements on is actually really rare: When starting this experiment I was expecting to find indie forums everywhere. I thought I would be able to post links on at least 10-15 different boards, so I was surprised when I was only able to dig up 4-5! There were a few other indie forums I came across, but none had boards for promotion. Perhaps the lack of data for this experiment highlights one of the bigger problems - trying to promote your game on forums is made all the harder by the lack of any forums to promote them on!


Would I do this again?

If I released a new game, I wouldn't post on forums again just for the express purpose of getting exposure. The most useful part I got from posting on these forums is not so much the views that came through, but from the bug fixing and gameplay advice people were able to give about the game. If I were to do it again, I would probably only post on one or two forums in WIP boards with the purpose of getting testing feedback. Once that was done, posting on exposure sites like reddit would be useful.

So I'd suggest pick a forum and a WIP board and use it for game feedback. Later you can use reddit or similar sites for exposure. Simply canvasing every forum you can find with a link to your game isn't that effective. Coincidentally enough, if you look back at the forum thread Notch made in his first minecraft post, he was posting it for game feedback, not exposure too smile.png


Anyone else have any experiences with promoting their game using forum posts?

9
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0


6 Comments


We do also have our new work-in-progress "indie corner", which we hope will address many of the problems with Your Announcements.  Games can be posted to it, and it's getting a small amount of traffic, but it's still incomplete, may be a little buggy at times, and although it's publicly accessible it isn't actually exposed in our site navigation yet.  Our plan is to display the games listed there in a MUCH more obvious and attractive way.

 

 

Thanks for sharing your initial results, looking forward to seeing what else you come up with trying other methods of advertising!

 

You've inspired me to compile and share some more data on this myself... but I'll leave the specific details till I've got past gathering data and started compiling it. :)

1

Share this comment


Link to comment

We do also have our new work-in-progress "indie corner", which we hope will address many of the problems with Your Announcements.  

 

That's looking really good! The prominence of screenshots and the ability to sort by categories is really nifty! I also really like how on the details page links to other areas of interest like their developer blog and news. Awesome smile.png

 

Over on the libGDX site they launched a gallery in the hopes of promoting indies, but there is no real way of voting up or sorting the games that are submitted. It quickly turned into 20+ pages of empty pages with 0 comments. So it's good to see you guys have something a bit more useful in the works biggrin.png

0

Share this comment


Link to comment

Two thoughts:

 

1. on r/indieGaming you got 26 click-throughs for 2 upvotes, and on r/androidGaming you got 13 click-throughs? How many upvotes were on r/androidGaming? It looks like you can assume for now that there's a 13 click-through/upvote ratio, if there's only one upvote. If that link is strong enough, and you can figure out why people are upvoting, you could turn a measly 50 upvotes into around 650 click-throughs. Doesn't mean anybody's buying, but once they're on your website you have many more tools for getting them to make the purchase. Very cool.

 

2. You went from 13 click-throughs to 600 click-throughs just by changing the title with r/androidGaming, but do you know for sure that only the title changed? What's the likelihood that the mere fact that it was a different day of the week gave you a boost? Did you post both at around the same time on each of the two days? I don't want to seem petty, but that little stuff matters a lot. In terms of straight figures, it's not a huge deal to go from 13 to 600, but percentage-wise, it's incredible. That's more than 4,000%. If your information is correct, on r/androidGaming at least, nothing but the title matters!

1

Share this comment


Link to comment

2. You went from 13 click-throughs to 600 click-throughs just by changing the title with r/androidGaming, but do you know for sure that only the title changed? What's the likelihood that the mere fact that it was a different day of the week gave you a boost? Did you post both at around the same time on each of the two days? I don't want to seem petty, but that little stuff matters a lot. In terms of straight figures, it's not a huge deal to go from 13 to 600, but percentage-wise, it's incredible. That's more than 4,000%. If your information is correct, on r/androidGaming at least, nothing but the title matters!

 

I think there are two main factors.

 

1) That metric was focused on reddit, and on reddit the title is basically all you have to go off. I tried several variations of titles over a few days and none seemed to grab until I got a lot more specific about the game mechanics. As soon as I mentioned something people already liked, it seemed to get a lot more attention.

 

2) Since /androidGaming was performing a tiny bit worse than /indieGaming when I posted it (it actually kept getting voted down when I first posted it), I decided to leave the /indieGaming post alone to compare the title. That way I could have some sort of comparison for the day of the week factors etc. Not the most scientific, but I'm thinking it would be interesting to post it on /indieGaming again with the new title and see how well it does. In fact, I might just go do that now! biggrin.png

 

 

There's one very important factor (which I've updated my post with), something you were getting at in the comments of my other blog post - Getting good data for this was difficult because finding forums is actually really really hard! I was originally planning on finding 10-15 forums but struggled to find 4-5. The lack of good indie forums with promotion boards are very few and far between. 

 

Thanks for your feedback smile.png

0

Share this comment


Link to comment

Very interesting experiment! biggrin.png Could you share what titles did you tried? It isn't clear what you mean by "targeting your demographic" with the title.

0

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now