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"Don't Eat Fruit" - World Health Organization

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RLS0812

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The World Health Organization has announced that it will be cutting back the "calories from sugar recommendation" to 5% of daily consumption. [LINK]

Problem is - no one has bothered to do the math.

The daily calorie intake for an adult human is 2,000 per day. [LINK]
This makes the max sugar intake 100 calories ( 2000 * 0.05 = 100 ) .
Sugar is 4 calories per gram. [LINK]
This means that an adult human is only allowed 25 grams of sugar a day ( 100 / 4 = 25 ) .

With that math done, I looked up how much sugar is in 1 serving of common fruit [LINK]
I than compared it to the daily recommendation of fruit [LINK]

It turns out if you follow the new sugar guidelines the WHO has set out, you will have to cut back significantly on your fruit intake.
Taking into account all the food you eat per day, you'd be limited to 1/4 to 1/2 serving of fruit per day - the nutrition guidelines say you need at least 2 servings.

Edit: I received a comment below regarding "sugar types" ...
As some one who has unstable blood sugar, I can tell you this: glucose is glucose, regardless of were it comes from. A single apple will spike my blood sugar the same as a 1oz chocolate bar ( I checked ) !

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Did you read the white paper transcript on this?  They're speaking of "Free Sugars".  Sugars that are either artificially added, or those in a concentrate form from a natural resource(such as juices or dried fruits).

 

This has no bearing on natural sugars that originate from whole foods. 

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Did you read the white paper transcript on this?  They're speaking of "Free Sugars".  Sugars that are either artificially added, or those in a concentrate form from a natural resource(such as juices or dried fruits).

 

This has no bearing on natural sugars that originate from whole foods. 

 

 As some one who has  unstable sugar - glucose is glucose, regardless of were it is from.  A 1 oz chocolate bar will spike my sugar the same as an apple ( I checked )

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That's an entirely different issue from the obesity problems mentioned in the white paper.  It metabolizes the same, but high concentrations of sugar being eaten - which predominately come from processed and concentrate foods - are stored  - making it extremely hard to burn off. The article is based on rises in obesity and foods that everyone already knows is bad for them.

 

Either way, too much of anything is a bad thing.  If you eat more than you burn off you store it.

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They have a definition of free sugar, look here. If you eat raw fruits, not all the sugar is accessible immediatly, your body need to break down the cell structures etc. to get access to the sugar, whereas free sugar is already procceed (eg. fruits put into a mixer) or added and your body is able to access it more or less immediatly.

 

Therefor you have more trouble with caries and the fast transport of sugar into your body (see glycemic index). The latter will lead to a fast increase of blood sugar concentration, which will result in an high amount of insulin in your blood, which will lead to other, not really healthy effects:

- glucose will be transformed into fat

- your blood sugar concentration will fall down really fast leading to more appetite

- the insulin production can be damaged over time  and your fat cells get resistent to insulin leading to diabetes mellitus II

 

 

You always need to distinguish between getting fat by eating to much calories (here it is not really important where the calories come from) and having an unhealthy way of eating. The reduction of free sugar is for a more healthy way of life.

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