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DevLog #11 - Greenlight Magic Number?

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CyberblastStudios

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The popular belief among developers running Greenlight campaigns is that there is no hard set yes vote threshold for which a title would likely be greenlit. However, I personally believe that threshold to be around 350 yes votes. I was working on a previous game called Precursor's Dawn that was greenlit at 351 yes votes. This was surely at the lower range of yes votes that greenlit games at the time had. We have spoken with other developers about their yes vote counts that they had when their project was greenlit. Most of their counts were right in the 345 to 350 range at the time they were greenlit by the community! Whether there is a threshold or not, it is surely something interesting to ponder about while you keep on developing your title and rooting for it on Twitter while you wait for yes votes to fly in! I would like to hear what anyone else thinks about this topic!

Go vote on The Harvest on Greenlight! http://steamcommunity.com/sharedfiles/filedetails/?id=448884478

Follow me on Twitter! https://twitter.com/CyberblastSoft

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Don't want to sound harsh or anything, just sharing my story/opinion. There probably isn't any hard set yes vote threshold :| ...
I'm also basing it only on experience, so I don't have loads of statistics and whatnot to prove it, but based on the traffic changes during the last two years of greenlight, I highly doubt there is one (or it is changed/lowered every month). Back when greenlight started, 5000-10000+ votes was "common" for good/well-known games, two years ago reaching a 1000 to 2000 votes on the system counted as pretty good...
A little more than a year ago when I put my game on greenlight, it reached approximately 500 yes votes in the first week, and back than it wasn't bad, but not enough for the top 100. A few months later it had around 1000 yes votes, with a pretty common yes/no ratio. It already spent a significant amount of time in the top 100. Since the list is always changing, games got greenlit, lot of games getting submitted, sometimes it event dropped out of the top 100 for a few days...
Back than, I asked around other developers too, how is it going, how many votes they got, stuff like that. When I had around 800-900 yes votes a game with 600 yes votes got greenlit after two weeks, even without reaching the top 100. I guess someone from valve saw it liked it and hit the green button :) .

My game was greenlit out of the blue after three months, already having close to zero traffic on it's greenlight page.

There are no "facts" about when a game is greenlit or when it is checked by valve, only superstition. Maybe someone from valve could share some "facts" :D , but the system is already at its final run :( ...

Closing words:
Nice job so far on "The Harvest", voted ;) !
Good luck with the game!

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From what I know, Valve was going through the submissions and manually approving green light items. It wasn't automated. The green lighting process was just a way for them to get community feedback on games to help in their decision making process. Steam has always been a platform of curated games. There are some games which can sit in green light forever, and no matter how many yes votes they get, they'll never see the light of day for some reason or another (ie, a game satirizing GabeN would be funny and get voted, but never approved by Valve). The key to getting greenlit is to make an amazing game with compelling content. After you're greenlit, you're only 10% there -- its not automatic success and validation. You now have to sell your game, and the best way to sell it is to make it good.

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[quote name="slayemin" timestamp="1489093548"]From what I know, Valve was going through the submissions and manually approving green light items. It wasn't automated. The green lighting process was just a way for them to get community feedback on games to help in their decision making process. Steam has always been a platform of curated games. There are some games which can sit in green light forever, and no matter how many yes votes they get, they'll never see the light of day for some reason or another (ie, a game satirizing GabeN would be funny and get voted, but never approved by Valve). The key to getting greenlit is to make an amazing game with compelling content. After you're greenlit, you're only 10% there -- its not automatic success and validation. You now have to sell your game, and the best way to sell it is to make it good.[/quote] I agree with you that they are manually going through them at least somewhat! And yes, a quality title is the best way to sell for sure.

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The is some math involved with the Greenlight Process. While Valve maybe handpicking the games that are being Lit in these final cycles, it has been, to some degree an automated process. The number of games being Greenlit at the exact same second would point to automation.

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