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First day of Greenlight

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desdemian

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So, finally, Posable Heroes got into greenlight on monday morning.

Preparation:

I prepared my 512x512 logo, which has to be less that 1mb so some optimization had to be done. I decided on an animated logo for extra attention. But the animated portion was small (like 30%) so the weight would not be as high.
Tip: This website was very helpful to reduce the last 100kb.

364QQnh.gif

I prepared my trailer:

The artist had a personal problem the last couple of weeks. I could not wait any longer for the extra levels we wanted to include, so I made them myself with parts I could pickup from other levels, and from free textures found online.

I got the soundtrack from audiojungle for 15 dollars.


I prepared the description:

Trying to use a short description at the beginning, and a main body to describe gameplay and show how the game works.

OgEbME5.gif

c09A1WR.gif

I can translate to spanish myself, and a kind person translated to russian for me. So 3 languages were supported.

Added google analytics.

Added links to twitter, youtube and facebook.

And then I pressed PUBLISH.

Inmediately after submitting, (like 30 minutes after), Posable Heroes was already 6th on the recent releases list. Damn! Want an advice? Don't publish on monday mornings. Compared to it, tuesday morning has been much slower as far as new submissions goes. I had manually tracked some values on thursday and friday, and everything pointed to 1.5 new games per hour. So this was a big bump I didn't expect.

But then again, I have no idea how Grenlight's algorithm works to show the game on people's queues. Is there a fixed number of impressions? Does yes/no ratio make you game more visible? Does falling to second page matters? I don't know.

26 hours later, I'm still on first page though, on slot 29th. By the time I finish writing this entry I probably have fallen into greenlight oblivion of the second page. Traffic has already slowed down and new votes (either 'yes' or 'no') have already stopped coming in. And I'm getting around 1 vote every 30 minutes... yikes.

How is it going so far?

MiizP4u.png

I had a good run on monday afternoon, reaching around 55% yes votes. But today I woke up to a very low 40% approval.
This was not unexpected, as the game is not really mainstream (nor a "gamer's game"). But I guess I did have a little bit of hope of getting a better approval ratio. Don't we all?

But I'm not down about the ratio, I am worried about how few votes (overall) I'm getting. So I need to find a way to pump those numbers up. How do games in the top 100 do it? They have like 6,000 votes! Is that organic?

I have been offered some promotion by shady marketing groups/companies. I don't want to go that route.

One curious thing: In the first 20hrs+ I had zero "Ask me later". Then, all of a sudden, 9 votes appear there in like 15 minutes. What was that about?

Anyway, on the good side, I had a good laugh with this comment:

uSGWtI9.png
It made me chuckle.

I'm thinking what other things I could do to get attention. I saw some groups on facebook but it just seems developers voting each others project, no matter the quality of the submissions. I'm not fond of that. Is that the game we are supposed to play?.

Right now I'm preparing something and see if any website wants to say a few words about the game, although everyone says that getting greenlight coverage is very hard.

Feel free to leave me suggestion in the comments!

And if you like the game, here the greenlight link.

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Wow, that video shows a huge amount of progress since I last took a proper look at this project. Looks absolutely awesome.

Best of luck with Greenlight.

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I saw some groups on facebook but it just seems developers voting each others project, no matter the quality of the submissions.

My observation is that the games industry is the developers' first customer. If you can bubble your way beyond the developer audience then you'll make it to the mainstream.

This isn't the only way to get noticed or out there, just the "easiest" on the wallet. Other options might be to place Facebook (or other online) ads, but to get enough there you might need to spend a fair amount of $$$. Search keywords might be another. You'll also want to try to get the game mentioned in an article on a popular gaming site, blog, or Twitch/Youtube influencer, but any of those might require $$$ too.

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I saw some groups on facebook but it just seems developers voting each others project, no matter the quality of the submissions.

My observation is that the games industry is the developers' first customer. If you can bubble your way beyond the developer audience then you'll make it to the mainstream.

Interesting. I've always heard "Developers are not your audience", and you shoudn't try to market at them since everybody is busy with their own games. I would argue that there are games that developers could very well be your audience, games about programming like TIS-100 come to mind.

But the group I was talking about is not even about that. It was about people upvoting and begging up votes for their own game in exchange. And people complied even for the worst kind of greenlight garbage. What kind of garbage? This kind

So you see why I want no part of that. I rather get my fee redunded and see if I can afford Direct instead.

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I saw some groups on facebook but it just seems developers voting each others project, no matter the quality of the submissions.

My observation is that the games industry is the developers' first customer. If you can bubble your way beyond the developer audience then you'll make it to the mainstream.

Interesting. I've always heard "Developers are not your audience", and you shoudn't try to market at them since everybody is busy with their own games. I would argue that there are games that developers could very well be your audience, games about programming like TIS-100 come to mind.

But the group I was talking about is not even about that. It was about people upvoting and begging up votes for their own game in exchange. And people complied even for the worst kind of greenlight garbage. What kind of garbage? This kind

So you see why I want no part of that. I rather get my fee redunded and see if I can afford Direct instead.

 

 

Gotcha. I can understand that.

The "developers are not your audience" is what everyone says, and it's very true - you can't make a living making games that developers want to play.

But some have had success with that route by building enough of an audience with developers that the network effect takes hold and the gaming press starts to pick it up.

Just my observation. :)

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First, the game look great, I'll support you.  Your video is polished, wow, well done.  

What kind of promotional work did you do prior to trying for green light?  What type of exposure did you implement?

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What kind of promotional work did you do prior to trying for green light?  What type of exposure did you implement?

 

Nothing paid for.  A few announcements on my devlog on tigsource, twitter and facebook, on a couple of subreddits. Yesterday I emailed a few websites to see if somebody wants to mention it. Let's see if that works.

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Don't think too much about the NO votes; the general consensus is that NO votes doesn't determine whether you get past greenlight or not. The initial days for my game on greenlight also hit a <50% yes-no vote before it fell off the frontpage, and only after 2 months did it climb back up to an even ratio in YES votes. So yes, being on the frontpage is significant for exposure; falling off it probably means you'll be stuck there. If you've showed the game off/released it on another platform, make sure its written on your greenlight page; you'll have a better chance that way.

PS. Here's the greenlight link to my game, I could use a vote or so!

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Any update on the progress of your Greenlight?

 

I'll make a post to update the situation. But tldr: after 17 days on greenlight, 600 unique visitors, 455 total votes, 47% approval (214), 10% on my way to the top, 0 or 1 new visitors per day.

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From all of the Greenlight campaigns that I have ran, been part of, or tracked the magic number of "Yes" votes are 350. Think about using FB and twitter, they have helped to get that last couple of pushes after you have moved off the 2 second page. Good Luck.

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