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WoA V Day 3

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IYP

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So today the progress was slow, first we had git problems and then some build problems, but we still had fair amount of progress how ever our todo list just kept getting bigger and bigger xD.

140bb9d869.png

We worked one menus, fixed some bugs, did some optimizations, discussed second level and worked a little on it and our artists made the texture for play ground, but more importantly we finished the game mechanics, meaning you can now jump around rotate dominoes and push them to destroy some castles, and play the first level, which I have in the video below, and the good new is it's already uploaded so no need to wait this time xD.

Hopefully every one is making good progress, good luck xD

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