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Key Things that Makes Unity Game Development Stand Out

Keval Padia

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Unity is considered as one of the most versatile and robust game development platforms worldwide. Unity took over the gaming industry principally thanks to its versatility in building a diverse array of games. It started only as a cross-platform game building tool and over the years having been used by thousands of most successful mobile game development companies became a robust and feature rich multi platform gaming language ideal for both easy to play 2D and immersive 3D games.

Unity by popularity easily surpasses all other game engines. But what makes it so unique and stood apart from the rest of the gaming engines? In trying to get the answer, we have come across a few attributes and qualities that make Unity lead the way.

Here are some of the qualities that give Unity an edge over others.

5a004875634e4_UnityGameDevelopment.thumb.jpeg.452150aa2db128cadafafcb5ebf1597b.jpeg

C# programming language

Unity game engine works basically with C# programming language. This language has been one of the most common and easy to learn coding language helps aspiring developers get an easy welcome into game development. C# as a language is known for lower learning curve while allowing most versatile programming for unique and feature rich apps across the niches including game apps.

Multiple platform development

Unity is not just a mobile cross-platform development engine as envisaged by many. It is now a robust multi-platform development engine having a simultaneous presence across all mobile platforms, Windows PC, Mac, game consoles and web. One unity game built by a developer can easily be deployed across all these platforms allowing bigger reach to game playing audience.

Unity has Multiplatform Solutions Framework or MSF which is known for easy administrative features to take care of all your game development issues while creating games for several platforms. From taking care of features that allow receiving web contents through servers to storage of game files, integration of the game across social channels, the robust multi-platform support through MSF eases the process of game development to a great extent.

Huge community support

For game development industry community support proves to be crucial to allow help in building new games and to solve development problems quickly. Gaming is a kind of industry that requires constant experiments and tweaking with elements to ensure quality. Naturally, whenever a new game feature or game playing function needs to be incorporated, a developer may require advice and support from other fellow minded developers. This is where Unity as a platform offers an unmatched advantage with a huge support team.

Unmatched creative freedom

Creative freedom in game development means a lot of things. Not only the creative ease and freedom of building a lot of custom tools help to deliver a different and standout game playing experience but such unique and custom tools also allow the developers enjoy a competitive edge in respect of lower development cost.

Unity as a very flexible platform allows you quickly iterating ideas for prototyping compared to most other ready to use tools in the market. Faster prototyping to try different game ideas give developers the ease of experimenting with new game ideas resulting in the creation of unmatched and never-before game apps. Many game development companies even while building games with their own in-house engines use Unity for the ease and creative freedom of prototyping.

AAA rated game quality

Even if you are a beginner or just a small aspiring game developer without much to say on your credit, with Unity game development you can build big games comparable with AAA rated games. There are several examples of small development companies achieving big feats by utilising Unity to come up with a robust AAA quality game. From animation heavy 3D games to easy to play simple mobile games, you can build the broadest range of games across the niches by using Unity.

Unity’s strength in building 3D games

Unity’s crucial strength lies in building sophisticated 3D games with relative ease compared to all other platforms. In creating great 3D games, it supports an array of sophisticated character building software like Adobe Photoshop, blender and 3D max. With an unmatched graphic engine and flexibility to utilise all these rendering software, Unity makes it easier to build shimmeringly immersive and engaging 3D games quickly.

Unity is affordable as well

When it comes to the rate and expenses on the license fee of a game engine, most developers and small development firms go on the back foot. In that respect, Unity proves itself awesomely affordable, especially for the small development forms and aspiring game developers. By giving the logo of Unity a place in your game, you can actually use the engine for free until the total revenue of the game does not exceed $ 100,000 per annum.

As and when you can afford to go for the Unity Pro license you need to shell out just $ 1,500 per person plus tax. Certainly, Unity Pro is a bit feature rich and allows using the engine on two computers by the same person, but if you want to make a footing with a successful game even regular and free Unity version seems good enough. Only when you grow sufficiently big Unity Pro seems a credible option with multiple licenses packed together.

Asset store

If you are a Unity game developer already, you must have wondered why we are mentioning this big Unity attribute at last. Hold your breath for a minute. We really know Unity Asset Store is really unique and unmatched in many respects and that is precisely why we rather decide to focus on it at last. Unity Asset Store can be enriched with third-party inclusions.

Unity Asset Store is rich with codes of popular gaming technologies like Cocos2D, Flash, Marmalade, etc. The asset store allows you finding ready to use 3D models UI, Photoshopped characters, physical engines, animated characters, all types of scripts, etc. With the use of ready to use assets available in the Unity asset store, you can reduce the development time and cost further.

The power of Unity with so many rich attributes, challenges and costs are literally luring for any would be a game developer. Unsurprisingly, most aspiring developers when considering to build a new game invariably think of Unity.



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