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VR VR experience Free Demo - Dreamart out now !

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Olivier Girardot

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Dreamart VR is the direct interpretation of a dreamworld. The player resonates with the mere subconscious thoughts of the virtual character.

The game consists of multiple scenes. Each Scene is directly or indirectly correlated to the previous scene, thus it unfolds the potential of a deep non linear VR experience.

You can download the experience here - https://limbicnation.itch.io/dreamartvr

E.N.J.O.Y

 

 

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