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Indie game is FUN but PAIN (2)

MushroomWorkshop

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First of all, you have to learn a totally new game development platform. I chose Unity due to its large pool of resources. Luckily, Unity is based on my primary programming language C# so that I can save sometime from learning new language. I recommend all newbies to try out the tutorials on the Unity community. Every tutorial includes tutorial video and whole game project. Thus, if you miss any step from the video, you can simply open the completed game project to take a look.

Screen Shot 2017-12-21 at 11.11.56 AM.png

Flappy Bird from Unity (https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials/topics/2d-game-creation/project-goals?playlist=17093)

 

It is certainly that your game has to be attractive enough to draw players. However, funny game is not the only factor that can make you succeed. Even it is the best game you have ever imagined, that would be possible that your game has 0 download over weeks, just because the game has a bad name. How do you define what a "bad" game name is? Well, even if you type the game name totally correct in Google Play and Apple App Store, you roll down to the bottom of the list and you still cannot find your game.

 

20171221_115002.png.44d4eca157aaeed7cbd985558d83951d.png

My game icon (Originally called "Bounce")

 

20171221_115021.thumb.png.704e614f1117e1d43f6be6eff1481468.png

Google Play search result of the game name "Bounce"

 

So, what should you do to make a "good" name? You really need to invest time to do some research. For those poor indie game developers like me, they need to find some free tools for help. Google has some build-in functions which can help you and give you some idea for a "good" name. I am going to talk about the tools in my next entry.

 

20171221_120758.thumb.png.f218a4455f8fc1ae56315171e13b0f7d.png

Google Play search result of the game name "Sibby Jump Adventure"

(to be continued...)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

MushroomWorkshop new free game rollout: Sibby Jump Adventure
Download and enjoy the Sibby's world!

 

Android:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.MushroomWorkshop.Bounce

IOS:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sibby-jump-adventure/id1315608631

 

Facebook Fan Page:

https://www.facebook.com/mushroomworkshop.apps/



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