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Choconoa Devlog #1

Iridescent Waves

1225 views

devlog_title.png

A 3D platformer in the world of pastries.


Hello! After 4 months of work, it's time for us to start a devlog for our new project!

STORY

You play Choconoa, the prince of the chocolate world, and you must grab back the sugar stolen by the princess of the candy world.

GAMEPLAY

The 4 gameplay pillars are:

  • You need to collect basic ingredients (chocolate, flour, eggs and milk) and recipes, and thanks to the magic of your wooden spoon, you can create a catapult.
  • The bonus collectible is a chef's hat wich allow you to bounce and be invincible for a limited time.
  • Next are the sliders which allow you to access different areas and grab extra collectibles.
  • Last is the chantilly on the floor which makes you go faster.
     

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FEATURES

  • LINEAR LEVEL DESIGN - SEQUENTIAL ORDER
  • SINGLE PLAYER AND LOCAL MULTI UP TO 4 PLAYERS SPLITSCREEN
  • COLORFUL STYLIZED ENVIRONMENTS
  • KID-FRIENDLY
  • PASTRY THEME
     

WHAT'S DONE

  • PROTOTYPE
  • BASIC MENU AND HUD
  • CORE GAMEPLAY
  • HERO BASIC ANIMATION SET
  • SOME ENVIRONMENT PLACEHOLDERS
  • SOME SOUNDS AND FX PLACEHOLDERS

TODO

  • LEVELS
  • CHARACTERS MODELS
  • ANIMATIONS
  • ART
  • SOUNDS AND MUSICS
  • TEST

TOOLS

  • UNREAL ENGINE 4
  • ZBRUSH
  • BLENDER
  • GIMP

TARGET PLATFORMS

  • WINDOWS, MAC AND LINUX
  • NINTENDO SWITCH


3 Comments


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Looking good! Sounds like it's mostly just additional content to go! :)

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Thanks! The code and level design are almost done. But we still need to do all the art and animations.

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So you've got the hard part done - and now the hard part to go! xD

From the three following updates it looks like you're making great progress on it though! :)

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