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Lost Art Studios

Kavik Kang

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I am looking for a programmer who is interested in making an indie game called Space Hockey. The design document can be downloaded from my blog on GameDev.Net. There are also over 600 pages of material relating too my 14-game Pirate Dawn Universe on this blog.

For now I am only looking for a programmer who is capable of making Space Hockey, and together we can assemble the rest of the team from there. I am looking for someone who is at least near 30 years old and has finished at least one game before. I don't want to distract younger people from establishing themselves in a career with the lure of making games, and I want someone who has made at least one game before so that they understand going into it how much work that entails even for a simple game like Space Hockey. It doesn't have to be a game that was published, the whole point is just that you understand how much work it is to actually finish it.

I am not looking to just make something to post on an indie site somewhere, the goal here is to eventually have Space Hockey for sale on Steam. As can be seen in the design document, once that has been achieved there is a lot of expansion of this that could take place resulting in half-a-dozen or so DLC expansions. This would begin as a hobby/indie project but will, hopefully, someday become a commercial game company. Assuming that Space Hockey and its DLC expansions were successful, the goal would be to transition into a commercial game company and begin work on the 14 games of my Pirate Dawn Universe.

I have been designing games and simulations since before the computer game industry existed, for about 40 years now. I don't say this out of arrogance. It is simply a fact of time that today, in 2018, I am one of the most experienced and knowledgeable game and simulation designers in the world. Although the very simple Space Hockey does not use it, a physical construct that I call “Rube” is the fundamental basis of what you know as “The Matrix”. Rube is also the fundamental basis of cyberspace, an insubstantial holodeck, and a self-programming computer with omniscient communication. The later games of the Pirate Dawn Universe such as Territories, Mission, Clash of the Titans, and the Struggle of the Ancients games are all based on Rube.

The Pirate Dawn Universe is a sci-fi universe focused on space ship games. Lost Art Studios games are based on the 300 years of game design that came before computer games. They are not, for the most part, based on past computer games. This is only one of the things that makes these games unlike any computer games that have ever existed before. As a former member of the SFB Staff, there is no competition out there for Lost Art Studios when it comes to making space ship games for the computer. If LAS can get off the ground, competing within this genre in the modern game industry would be like hunting rabbits with a 120mm cannon.

This will begin as a hobby/indie project to create Space Hockey, and we can establish a typical deal where those who contribute to the creation of the game receive some form of payment if and when the game actually makes money. I really don't care about the money very much and am open to anything that works. The true goal, however, is to get Lost Art Studios off the ground as a commercial game company that will very easily dominate the space ship game genre with its 40 years of accumulated knowledge of the Star Fleet Universe community. And, of course, Rube... which also partly comes from the SFU. Even if Lost Art Studios manages to get off the ground, we would not attempt to develop a truly large or complex game at first. Part of the plan within the design of the games of the PDU is that the first three games are smaller and more simple games to make.

Territories is a prequel, that “Civilization scale war game” is first chronologically but can be made at any point during the telling of the PDU story. The actual first three games are intentionally simple to make. As an MMO Pirate Dawn is “massive” from the player's perspective, but it it is actually a fairly small and simple game too make. The “massiveness” of Pirate Dawn is an illusion too the player. The game itself isn't actually “massive”, the simple arcade game maps are. Manifest Destiny and The Trade Wars, what would be the second and third games, are both smaller and easier to produce than Pirate Dawn is. They are both intentionally minimalist strategy economic war game “scenario generators” where the focus is heavily on the tactical combat resolution (which is not 3D). Lost Art Studios would not even attempt to make a “big game” until we were on our fourth release.

If you are interested in helping to create Space Hockey, with a plan already place to keep going from there, you can contact me through my blog on GameDev.Net or my e-mail address:

From Astral Invasion...

 




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All of the songs of The Yes Album are a part of the Astral Invasion story;-)

 

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I am still looking for a programmer who wants to make Space Hockey with a plan to continue making games within this same universe for... the rest of our lives, actually. A programmer mentioned that they thought Space Hockey could be made in less than one year, Space Hockey is a pretty special game for something that can be made in less than a year. Lost Art Studios really is decades ahead of the competition when it comes to making space ship games, and some of the later games such as Territories, Mission, Clash of the Titans, and Struggle of the Ancients are truly revolutionary designs unlike any games that have ever existed before. Clash of the Titans, for example, would be the first strategy game of space fleets that actually works as a strategy game rather than single “death ball” fleets of every ship on each side chasing each other around the map in what amounts to a completely broken game. It's hard to believe that nobody is interested in any of this, it really is... I really am living in the Twilight Zone.

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Since I've been revealing a lots of aspects of the Astral Invasion story towards the end here, I thought I'd cap it off with a little more variety. In all of the games of the PDU the story is told by the music as much as the text, and the story is always originally derived from the song lyrics. There is a format too it, as well, where the primary story arc is always one band and is always based on an entire album from that band using songs from other albums from that band that also fit the story. Major side story arcs are thematically separated from the primary story arc (and each other), by being other bands. So story arcs always also have a unique sound and atmosphere based on the band that is telling that story arc. Obviously, in Astral Invasion, Yes is the sound and inspiration of the primary story arc of the sun exploding. The Yes Album is the core of it, and several songs from Fragile and 90125 are also used for the primary story arc.

Here's one song from each of the major side story arcs of the Astral Invasion story, and the three bands that are telling them.

This one is related to the story of a space marine general named Gloria Grace, who you would have seen in Armageddon Chess if you read that. If you were really paying attention, you might have also noticed the line “God gave us grace to save this place”;-) General Grace is the last of the pantheon ascendants of the first time through the broken time loop, she is Artemis. Yes, there are a lot of female heroes in the PDU, because there are a lot more Greek goddesses than there are gods and they all need to do some great thing and ascend at some point during the story.

 

Another big thing going on in Astral Invasion, besides Artemis ascending and the sun exploding, is that Andrea “Death Stalker” Takahashi's big moment happens during this game. Andrea hasn't made it into this blog much because the focus was on Cindy, but she was inspired by a line from Babylon 5 and Andrea (she's actually been called “Suzi” since she was a child, only the authorities and the media use her legal name Andrea) is Cindy McAllen's “equal but opposite”. This is partly about Andrea having just made a fundamental change in her philosophy.

 

And, this one... I will just cryptically post without further comment;-)

 

 

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On 19/01/2018 at 10:23 AM, Kavik Kang said:

Lost Art Studios really is decades ahead of the competition when it comes to making space ship games, and some of the later games such as Territories, Mission, Clash of the Titans, and Struggle of the Ancients are truly revolutionary designs unlike any games that have ever existed before. Clash of the Titans, for example, would be the first strategy game of space fleets that actually works as a strategy game rather than single “death ball” fleets of every ship on each side chasing each other around the map in what amounts to a completely broken game. It's hard to believe that nobody is interested in any of this, it really is... I really am living in the Twilight Zone.

hehehe, I feel your burden.  Around here everyone is hoping to make a game that breaks ground in novel and fun ways.  I think though one has to bring forth some evidence of their idea in order for it to be taken more seriously by the community.  Like my game, I get a lot of people looking, but not a lot of expressed interest yet, which is to be expected because I haven't provided the community with anything to try.  Like wise, you may find it hard attracting long-term dedication to your ideas seeing as right now they are just that, ideas.

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They are not just ideas.  I am a game designer, not a programmer.  Most of these games exist, and Rube exists.  The modern game industry's often quoted phrase "ideas are a dime a dozen" is far more accurately stated as "bad ideas are a dime a dozen".  These games are not ideas, they exist.  I know exactly how every one of them functions, at least half of them have near-complete "full notes" stage design documents, and I can play every one of them in my mind.  I already know how they work, I am not guessing.  That's what my generation of game designers do... "we already know how it works" we don't "blindly blunder forward through trial and error praying that things work out well in the end" as is the institutionalized process of the modern game industry.

There are over 600 pages about the PDU on this blog, including two first draft design documents, how much more do you expect me to reveal?  Especially considering that, as far as I know, there is not a single person who has actually even bothered to read any of it...

 

EDIT: I forgot about Space Hockey, there are actually 3 first draft design documents on this blog.  And I really don't see how it is possible that not a single person has ever said a single word too me about the story or the games.  Not even a Rush fan?  How is that possible?  That is why for the last 6 months or so I've been saying that I have to be "living in the Twilight Zone".  It doesn't seem possible that not even a single Rush fan has had anything to say about it, but it is somehow true.

 

Edited by Kavik Kang

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If I can't find anyone who is interested in making Space Hockey, than I am out of ideas again and I will at least know that I tried every possible way of doing what I was born to do over the last 40 years.  There is nothing else I could have tried to do that I can think of.  So I also wanted to point out here that my games are not based on "my ideas".  They are the "next generation" of the games made by companies like Avalon Hill, Amarillo Design Bureau, SPI... a whole different gaming world than the one you know.  A gaming world that spent a lot longer time than you have yet to reach arriving at our way of doing things.  Those companies were originally continuing the tradition of the "ruler & string" games that had been played by real world military men for centuries.  There is a lot more about all of this on my Gamasutra blog...

https://www.gamasutra.com/blogs/MarcMichalik/787769/

The Pirate Dawn Universe is the next generation of all that.  Not those types of games made as computer games, those types of games translated into computer games.  And Steve Cole's Impulse Chart is a far more sophisticated thing than modern gamers believe exists in "board games".  In fact, it's far more sophisticated than even world class SFB experts believe it too be.  These are not "my ideas", this is a form of simulation design that is ultimately centuries old.

Edited by Kavik Kang

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Awoken

Posted (edited)

7 hours ago, Kavik Kang said:

They are not just ideas.  I am a game designer, not a programmer.  Most of these games exist, and Rube exists.  The modern game industry's often quoted phrase "ideas are a dime a dozen" is far more accurately stated as "bad ideas are a dime a dozen".  These games are not ideas, they exist.  I know exactly how every one of them functions, at least half of them have near-complete "full notes" stage design documents, and I can play every one of them in my mind.  I already know how they work, I am not guessing.  That's what my generation of game designers do... "we already know how it works" we don't "blindly blunder forward through trial and error praying that things work out well in the end" as is the institutionalized process of the modern game industry.

Congrats, if you've got the game sketched out in your mind then you're way further ahead than most of us, but you probably already know that.  o.k, you say that you're about to give up on getting your game out there.  I'd focus on the bolded portion of what I quoted, that is unfortunately your short coming.  If you don't get around to learning that skill, your games will probably never see the light of day because what you're hoping for, I suspect, is someone to come along and read through your documentation and learn how your games work and then agree to help you out.  But... you're forgetting one important thing, most of us here are here to program our own games.  Learn to program and this community will help you out immensely, till then you're likely talking in the wind.

I hope one of your games is realised one day

Cheers

Edited by Awoken

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Programming isn't my thing, I would never be a good one.  I am a game designer, I spent my life learning that.  Becoming a great game designer and programmer would be the same thing as becoming a great doctor and engineer.  The people in the computer game industry have always said they hire game designers, but they don't really mean it.  They hire level designers.  The games are designed by committee, in the vast majority of cases there is no game designer... although they use the title for level designers.  By our definition, they don't have game designers.  But they think they do, because they have a completely different definition of what that term means.  It took me a long time to realize that this had been the main issue throughout most of my life.

I'm not a programmer and I'm never going to be, and I am never going to make games because the modern game industry doesn't use game designers.  They think they do, but that's just because they think a level designer is a game designer.

The thing is... I really am four decades ahead of you when it comes to space ship games.  Not because I'm special, but because I am a part of an entire community that is four decades ahead of you in this area.  Your space ship games really are very close to Candyland compared to the PDU, it really can't be overstated.  That makes this all particularly frustrating too me.

I'll add something just in case there is anyone out there that has actually read the story on this blog and liked it enough to really take it in.  If you exist, you are probably pretty blown away by the lyrics of Magic Power.  There are five different valid interpretations of it, for one thing.  Another is that early on I didn't want to reveal Marvin's last name so I just replaced it with the very uninspired "Cayce".  As a thank you to you if you are out there, and this would reveal one of the possible interpretations of Magic Power, Marvin's last name is actually "Vaith";-)

 

Edited by Kavik Kang

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5 hours ago, Kavik Kang said:

I'm not a programmer and I'm never going to be

Why exactly do you think so?

You say you designed your games in detail in your mind, and they exist, you know they work, etc. That's exactly what a programmer is doing. (But it's easier for us: If our algorithm fails, we can figure out the reason discovering an aspect of the problem we did not think about. So programming is both helpful to understand a problem and to proof its solution, and its an iterative process - no need to think about every tiny detail beforehand - mostly.)

You define detailed rules for your games and imagine exactly how they play - again that's what a programmer is doing. We think about what data we need, what we want to calculate from that and how results affect logical decisions. we let the program flow happen in our mind before we code it.

Programming itself is not hard. Working on difficult problem is hard, but that has nothing to do with programming. From what you say you have already solved all problems for your games. (I know nothing about the games you mention, but i'm sure none of them tackle difficult problems like physics simulation, high performance rendering or AI - how should they? Luckily the game engines available nowadays have all this built in already. You don't need to be a top programmer anymore.)

 

What is hard is getting started.

Learning programming gets quickly hindered by starter questions like: What Programs do i need, how do i get input and output, how to draw something, how to load from HD, etc. This is frustrating, and by using a game engine this only gets worse (but it saves you years of work in return - all those years you wasted in not learning programming :) ).

Maybe you should give it another try - you don't want a young and inexperienced programmer, you don't get get the experienced guy... what other options do you have than do it yourself? Download Unity, look for a Pong (or in your case Asteroids) tutorial project, get it to work and then play around just for fun...

 

 

 

 

 

 

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It's not my thing, I would never become truly good at it.  You need to be great at it to be of any help in your business.  I've worked with "AAA" programmers before.  I would never become good enough at it to be more of a hindrance too them than a help.  Someone good be in an endless state of cleaning up my mess.  I wouldn't try to become an artist, either, because I have no talent for it.  I believe there are only two ways for a game designer to find a way into the computer game industry.  You either need to be a programmer or artist, and you can become a part of the committee.  Not really a game designer, but at the same time you will be "designing games".

To be a true game designer, designing the games and creating the background/story, you need to be both a businessman and a designer.  This was as true in the hobbyist game industry as it is in yours, it was just a lot cheaper and easier to do with board games.  Often a one-man operation running out of a spare bedroom.  There is a little more too it than that if you want to make computer games, and either way you have to be two things if you want to be a game designer who is "creating their own art".  And that is my problem, I only do one thing.  I am as terrible of a business man as I am a programmer or artist.  Space Hockey is actually the fourth time that I have tried to start my own company to make games.  The only time I ever came close was when my father, unlike me being a businessman is his thing, devoted a tiny bit of his time to help and almost did it.  But I won't ever pull that off on my own, as you can probably see from my two post attempt that is all I can think to do along those lines.

I really am very good at what I do, but there really is only one thing that I do well.

What the heck, another Astral Invasion Cindy song...

 

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1 hour ago, Kavik Kang said:

It's not my thing, I would never become truly good at it.  You need to be great at it to be of any help in your business.

In the business i used to work last time, nobody of us was great at what he was doing, really :)

And again, time has changed. Today artists with some basic scripting skills create games, some of them very good. We are heading towards creating professional games just by clicking. If you really want to create computer games, you can. You could start with something simpler, like Game Maker.

I work for 4 months on a problem that i'm still unable to solve. I'm not good at this stuff. There are few people who finally developed seemingly good solutions for the problem after a decade of research - maybe. Academic experts, so i do not understand what they say in their scientific papers. I really don't like to work on the problem, it's kinda boring, most code i already wrote is useless. But i must succeed - otherwise i'm totally stuck. And nobody will join me to help even if i claim my vision is worth it. I have to show it really works first i guess.

So, i really think you should to do the same. Even if it's just for fun and still won't work after a year. Writing design documents is not enough. What you do is like going to a record company without a demo tape and not willing to sing, compose or play an instrument.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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That's really just another way of saying "they don't hire game designers in this business" which they've been insisting isn't true for 35 years.  They get downright offended by it.  But like I said in an earlier post, I've understood for a long time now that it is because they have a completely different definition of the term.

I might, as a hobby after I give up on this, mess with something like GameMaker just to do something for myself.  That would be a very long road to making my games, and I don't have a long road anymore.  I will be 50 later this year, and I was born with a genetic condition that makes me already older than I should expect to live.  But my family has a history of living to an old age for someone with this problem.  So I probably only have 10 or 15 years left.  Making simple board-game like things in a generic editor is not going to get me to making PDU games in any kind of amount of time that I have left.  Really, I should have been making computer games in the early 1990s, the computer game industry has never liked board game designers right from the beginning.  I know, I was there.  So I was really just born into the wrong career at exactly the wrong time in history.

And I do have skills to help other than just writing it.  I did all 30 levels of Sinistar: Unleashed across four levels of difficulties through the raw data files in under 3 months.  As soon as I have something to work with... "a game is never finished, someone wearing a suit eventually rips it from your hands and puts it on a shelf".  I would never be happy with it, or consider it to be "finished", there would always be more than I could possibly do before it shipped.  And finishing the story of any one game is a monumental task when there are 11 other games intricately woven through it as well.

I'm not going to get to the PDU in any amount of time that I have playing with a generic editor.  If those kinds of things existed 20 years ago I'm sure I would have done a lot of things with them, but in 2018 its a little late for me for that.

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Since I've given away so much of the spine of the Astral Invasion story that I wasn't originally meaning too, I'll add this as well.  Especially considering the Triumph songs I posted, and how perfect the final lines of this one are.  I'll also mention that this is all closely related to the Time of the Titans chess set in Armageddon Chess, and only someone who has gotten into the story spread across this whole blog, and really taken it in, will be likely to be able to make much sense of all of this other than just what is apparent on the surface.  Although after reading just Space Hockey, and what I have given away about Astral Invasion in Space Hockey and since posting Space Hockey, the trailer and theme songs of Fallen Angel Rising found in the Armageddon Chess blog post will have a lot more meaning too you.

 

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Awoken

Posted (edited)

Kavik Kong, are you actually a retired serviceman? I checked out your blog briefly.   I suddenly started thinking that maybe you're someone who's got many more years on us all.  Did you participate in lots of war-games or something?  Totally shooting in the dark here, was just thinking is all.

Edited by Awoken

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I was never in the military myself, but have known a great many people who were over the years.  Today I know a lot of majors, colonels, and even a couple generals.  That's where me and my games come from, the PDU is the "next generation" of the games played by real world military men for centuries.  From the Ruler & String games, through Avalon Hill and ADB, to my final "3rd generation" translation of it all into computer games.  The PDU is, in many ways, one of the few remaining legacies of the original gamers... real world military men.

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Just in case there is actually someone out there who has read all of the story on this blog and is really getting into all these revelations about how it all ends, here's a bonus for you.  Not only will the lyrics have a lot of meaning too you if you know the story, but I've always considered this to be one of the greatest songs ever written.

 

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And, why not, the song/movie where you would actually see the sun explode!

 

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I am still looking for a programmer who is interested in very easily dominating the sci-fi space ship genre of the computer game industry. As any merely competent person would know, there is no competition for a former member of the Star Fleet Battles Staff among the 1st graders playing in the sand box (making Candyland-based games) of this business. This will be like shooting fish in a barrel.

Contrary to the many wildly inaccurate rantings at the end of my last thread that I was not allowed to respond too (cowards...), I was what your industry would term an “assistant designer” during the actual design phase of the final edition of SFB. My name appears in all of the core rules/products of the game such as Basic Set, Advanced Missions, and the Tactics Manual. Because of this, my name is among the most respected and well-known in the 40 year long history of the Star Fleet Universe. In that small world I am a celebrity among minor celebrities. I was also one of only four staff members ever actually hired by the company as a paid employee, and founded the tournament that became the most legendary “Den of Aces” in the entire SFB tournament system (which was second only to the World Chess Federation as table-top game tournaments go). Welcome back to reality.

I am merely speaking about them in the same exact manner that they have spoken too me for about 35 years now. For some reason it is perfectly acceptable for them to speak too me this way, but it is some type of affront against humanity for me to say the same exact things right back too them. The only real difference is that we are the actual educated, competent, and experienced ones and they are foot-stomping red-faced children who's fragile little egos cannot tolerate the presence of real game and simulation designers who predate them by centuries and shatter their delusional fantasy world of “Candyland Genius”.

If anyone is interested in being completely dominant in the space ship game genre I am still looking for a programmer to get this started. In about 35 years of trying they've never come anywhere within the remote vicinity of doing space ships well. It would be impossible to not succeed in this if we can get the games made, there is no competition for the SFB Staff when it comes to making space ship games. We aren't just in a different league, we are on a different planet... and any competent person would know that already.

E-Mail: kavik_kang@hotmail.com

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I love the amount of dedication you are giving to your field of work but if I may help in some way,  it sounds like you realistically need to hire a programmer to produce your game. It would be difficult to ask an experienced programmer to work for your company and on your designs for a year for free.  Even if there is 'possibly' some payment after it is finished and profitable, this is still not much of an incentive. I personally would just want to work on my own projects as a hobby and I'm sure many other programmers here would feel the same. You could have a programmer partner in some project but be prepared for them to have input into the game being created . Otherwise you may be better doing it all yourself. You don't need to be AAA programmer to produce a profitable game, BUT you WILL need to be good at the business side if you want your company to be a success. I wish you best of luck. 

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Yes, I actually realize all of that.  It is very unlikely that I will ever get to make any of my games.  "Game designer" is not a valid job description in the modern game industry.

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Sorry to here.  If you already realized what I was saying, can I presume you have not hired a programmer because your company can not afford one?  If so, apart from creating it yourself, I totally agree with you that you are really going to struggle to get YOUR EXACT game created for YOUR company for free. 

Kavik Kang: I don't have any money to pay other people, I am barely getting by myself since I stupidly devoted my life to become the best in the world at a job that doesn't exist.  If you read my post in the "One Vision" thread you'll see that I was a part of the group of people that invented the form of collaborative game design that the computer game industry uses today.  The first few games of the PDU are meant to be made that way.  Only Territories and Mission are "fragile" and need to be made mostly my way or they won't work at all, but the first three games of the PDU are intentionally very simply and open to "interference" from others.

Addressing that issue has always been a part of the plan of the PDU. 

Edited by Kavik Kang

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15 hours ago, Kavik Kang said:

Contrary to the many wildly inaccurate rantings at the end of my last thread that I was not allowed to respond too

Let's be a bit more honest about what happened in that topic. You were not only allowed to, but actually did respond after all of the posts questioning your credentials, and made no effort to address it.

The post was later closed by a moderator not involved in the discussion as it was getting circular, unproductive, and impolite; apologies for my part in that.  It is wildly inaccurate -- and like many of your claims in that topic, trivially disproved -- to suggest that you were not given a chance to respond.

 

For the record, my claim about your credentials is based on the available credits online for the products in the SFB line. If the actual credits differ from that, I will happily retract that portion of my remarks and give you my apology - and would suggest that you have the oversight corrected, as other people checking your credentials (such as people considering hiring or working with you) will be using the same method as me of checking online.

 

You've been given lots of advice on improving your approach to getting games made, including in that topic, and I would suggest taking some of it - but if you would prefer to continue that same rhetoric that hasn't succeeded for over a decade go right ahead.

You don't have to be this world changing designer to recruit successfully -- the difficult-to-believe claims actually harm your image -- the fact that you've worked on a couple of shipped products would actually be impressive if you just stated it plainly without the pomp and grandeur.

 

Good luck. 

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None of my "claims" in that topic were "trivially disproved".  Everything I said is true.  I have been at this for 35 years, I've already tried all of the things people suggest.  In fact, in many cases, I was probably the first person to try those things.  I have already established that none of those things work.  I've tried it all already.  This is all that is left.  Nothing else works.  And you are still acting like your industry hires game designers when we both know that they don't.  

I am being honest about what happened in that thread, you got in a bunch of easily disproven attacks in on me and then closed the thread (like cowards) before I could respond.  You need to be more honest about what happened in that thread, pretty much everything you people said at the end that I was not able to respond too is disproven by things that are already on my blog.  I tried it EXACTLY the way you are describing in this post for about 25 years, that never got me anywhere.  I didn't become "Pirate Lord" until after that.  I am way, way past that.  I did it the way you say I should for 25 years and was completely ignored for 25 years.

As for my "credentials", here is another way of putting it... if you only know the names of 10 SFB Staff members, mine is among the only 10 names that you know.

If anyone wants to completely dominate the space ship game genre of the computer game industry, I am still looking for a programmer.  We can't fail, there is no competition out there and they've never managed to do space ships well in 35 years of trying.  It would be like shooting fish in a barrel.  The SFB Staff are the founding fathers of modern game design.  If there is not a single person out there that is interested in this, then I've finally proven beyond all doubt that the modern game industry is incompetent.

It really is that simple.

 

Edited by Kavik Kang

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1 hour ago, Kavik Kang said:

If there is not a single person out there that is interested in this, then I've finally proven beyond all doubt that the modern game industry is incompetent.

Let's just go with that then, if it'll make you feel better, and call this argument finished.

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