Advertisement Jump to content
  • Advertisement
  • entries
    10
  • comments
    7
  • views
    1399

Mod yourself into Game Development

Timmmmmmmmmm.. T

881 views

This coming week, my game design club will (finally) start working on Digital Games.

Last week we made paper concepts.  Most of us have ZERO Game engine experience, this is going to be thrilling!!!
I've decided to bring everyone into a 2D engine called Defold, which outputs Cross-platform (Mostly HTML5) games with LUA Scripting and joint animations.

That's great Timm, but who's going to answer their questions?
They are, of course!  I have never used Defold, but in the Game Dev industry, they will

  • routinely have to self-teach to keep up
  • Rely on teammates to solve problems that nobody really knows the answer to
  • Rarely if ever start a game from square zero, they'll always build on others' work.

To that end, rather than making a game from zero (/*programmers NEVER start at square one*/), we are going to mod a public platformer template.  

Hopefully, we can divide into some kind of logical teams based on specialty and ability.  Good groups are small enough to enable everyone's input, but big enough to explode productivity.

My Experience:

Modding is better than square zero for learning game development:

  • THOUGHT PROCESS:  Since every large company has their own proprietary engine, learning how to learn an unfamiliar engine is invaluable
  • WORKFLOW: Game Companies will teach you by letting you dive into existing code, which is exactly what modders do
  • SPECIALIZATION: You can focus on your specialty (programming, art, music, level design) instead of trying to juggle ALL OF THEM so that you can get a job in ONE OF THEM.
  • SCALE: You get experience in a HUGE PROJECT that you may never fully understand rather than a tiny demo 
  • RESULTS: You can make something awesome (though not quite as accessible) in a shorter time since most of the heavy lifting is done
  • PLAYERS: You already have a huge player base and a known target audience if you mod a popular game.  this looks great on a resume
  • FEEDBACK: If you do have lots of players, you have lots of complaints.  Learn to deal with it, noobs.

Today, I got to see an eight-year old open his VERY FIRST Raspberry Pi.  I taught him to install NOOBS and use it, and he's really excited to change the world (For one, he won't be bored at home anymore).
I showed him the built-in python games and how to edit their code (to make yourself faster, bigger, etc.).   
Even though I can code faster than I can make bad jokes, I would never have been able to make a game with him... but just editing a couple lines of code in an existing game brought about some super-fun results. 

So basically, I showed him how to mod as a gateway* into programming :)

 

*Not a Gateway 2000, he's too young for those

27908399_2133855000230658_7971844948527972012_o.jpg



1 Comment


Recommended Comments

Modding is a great way to start the game development process. Instead of spending a year or two learning how to program, you get to jump in and tinker with stuff seeing immediate (and fun) feedback for your efforts. It's a ton easier to stay motivated than writing "guess a number" games. 

For those that show interest in programming, I'd guide them towards more code oriented modding (scripting) and also Khan Academy to learn a programming language. It's a great resource.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Advertisement
  • Advertisement
  • What is your GameDev Story?

    In 2019 we are celebrating 20 years of GameDev.net! Share your GameDev Story with us.

    (You must login to your GameDev.net account.)

  • Blog Entries

  • Similar Content

    • By Geonamic
      In my turn-based, RPG game, Forsaken Alchemy, I plan to have voiced character monologues and dialogues play along with some character animations after every battle, and I'd like to hear your thoughts on if wording is presented to be realistic in speech patterns, how all the characters sound in personality, if they sound similar in personality to each other, and any feedback on anything. There are in-battle criteria to trigger certain quotes more often than others, but I won't bore you with them. I just wanted to put that out in case you were curious how the below criteria matters in probability.
      Every quote in the solo quotes spoiler box is an instance of the character having a monologue. It's not him/her saying every single quote after one battle, so RNG will decide which of the listed solo quotes will play alone after a battle. For example,
      "Yes! I won!"
      and
      "That was easy!"
      are randomly picked per battle. The person is not saying, "Yes! I won! That was easy!"
      Solo quotes:
      When there's an empty line of space between dialogue, that means the next line is the start of a new dialogue. For the example below, after the second quote from Alvis is a different instance of dialogue that plays if RNG picks that to be played instead of the previous instance.
      Alvis: “I wish I knew even half as much knowledge that you know.”
      Victoria: “In time, you will.”
      Alvis: “That’s a pretty optimistic view.”
      Victoria: “For a scholar, you did well in that fight.”
      Alvis: “I’m just lucky I got out of it with everything intact.”
      Victoria: “You should be more confident about your keen strategies.”
      Group quotes:
       
    • By acid cookie
      Let me introduce myself first ,I am a student major in chinese literature(your know ,I am from china ),but I really don't want to study literature anymore ,for the academic system is so bad .I want to choose a more freedom and sincere field to study (I know it‘s not very easy).By accident ,I have access to indie games ,and I think it's more closed to what I want to express(writing can complete some goals too ,but I pay more attention to interaction),I learn python and processing by myself (do some simple things ,just for fun ),but I have no idea how can I complete a game by myself .I even plan to apply to graduate school (like NYU,USC) to study game design ,but I have no works now……I really need some advice .
      I find this website accidently(how luck I am !)  ,VPN sometimes works  not very well ,maybe I can't reply the comments promptly .
      Thank you very much ! 
    • By khawk
      Investment in game-based learning companies was sharply up in 2018, according to leading serious games analyst firm, Metaari. A total of $2.25 billion went to 133 companies. In contrast, $948.2 million was invested in 150 game-based learning companies in 2017.   While the number of deals declined slightly in 2018, funding levels were much higher and investment more than doubled. Almost 100 companies reported raising substantial funds.   Seventeen PreK-12 academic-facing companies obtained funding in 2018. Twenty-one corporate-focused companies producing game-based training were funded.   China is the education technology center of the universe, at least for now, according to Adkins. In 2018, 51 Chinese game-based learning companies garnered a combined total of $539.3 million. Nearly 50% of all ed tech investments made in 2018 went to Chinese companies.    “This is the first time in the history of the industry that China overtook the US. A stunning $7.22 billion was invested in 207 Chinese learning technology companies in 2018,” Sam Adkins said.   Metaari produces annual reports on the global game-based learning market. The reports, available from Serious Play Events, include an analysis of the catalysts driving the market as well as both a demand and supply-side analysis, providing publishers with the ability to choose high-yielding opportunities. In July, Metaari predicted a 37.1% CAGR growth rate for game-based learning products over the next five years. That growth would mean revenues will more than quadruple to well over $17 billion by 2023.    Metaari’s Global 2018-2023 Game-Based Learning Market is available for sale from Serious Play Conference here: www.seriousplayconf.com/reports   Metaari also produces reports on the Mixed Reality Learning Market and the Market for Mobile Educational Games.
      View full story
    • By khawk
      Investment in game-based learning companies was sharply up in 2018, according to leading serious games analyst firm, Metaari. A total of $2.25 billion went to 133 companies. In contrast, $948.2 million was invested in 150 game-based learning companies in 2017.   While the number of deals declined slightly in 2018, funding levels were much higher and investment more than doubled. Almost 100 companies reported raising substantial funds.   Seventeen PreK-12 academic-facing companies obtained funding in 2018. Twenty-one corporate-focused companies producing game-based training were funded.   China is the education technology center of the universe, at least for now, according to Adkins. In 2018, 51 Chinese game-based learning companies garnered a combined total of $539.3 million. Nearly 50% of all ed tech investments made in 2018 went to Chinese companies.    “This is the first time in the history of the industry that China overtook the US. A stunning $7.22 billion was invested in 207 Chinese learning technology companies in 2018,” Sam Adkins said.   Metaari produces annual reports on the global game-based learning market. The reports, available from Serious Play Events, include an analysis of the catalysts driving the market as well as both a demand and supply-side analysis, providing publishers with the ability to choose high-yielding opportunities. In July, Metaari predicted a 37.1% CAGR growth rate for game-based learning products over the next five years. That growth would mean revenues will more than quadruple to well over $17 billion by 2023.    Metaari’s Global 2018-2023 Game-Based Learning Market is available for sale from Serious Play Conference here: www.seriousplayconf.com/reports   Metaari also produces reports on the Mixed Reality Learning Market and the Market for Mobile Educational Games.
    • By SIr Pep
      I've been looking around for Pixel arts tutorials the last couple of days and realized there's not a ton of resources out there.

      So here's a list of links to help whoever is looking to learn "2d Pixel Art"

      http://www.pixeljoint.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=11299
      http://finalbossblues.com/pixel-tutorials/
      http://www.yarrninja.com/pixeltutorial/

       
      Hope you guys enjoy I'll post whatever else I can find. If you know any good website let me know in the comments
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!